How Long Can Corn Hold It’s Breath?

Days of rain dumped 4 – 6 inches of rain in our part of the world earlier this week.

So what’s that mean for the crop?

We wanted to share this insight from Bushel Billy, our pal Bill Bowers, with Bayer. He has a lot of great information straight from the truck cab!

Take a look –

 

As always, your YieldPro Specialist is ready to talk through the early season decisions on your farm!

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A Photographic Lesson in Perspective

It was a day full of media creation:

  • Interview an agronomist on-camera about current disease pressures.
  • Interview an energy manager on-camera about propane safety.
  • Film a propane sales specialist conducting an in-home safety check.
  • Take various photos during each of these video shoots to have stored in our photo library for use down the road.

We arrived at the homestead where we were going to shoot the in-home propane safety check and I was impressed. A beautiful home which sat off the road, a well-manicured yard, and flawless landscaping that seemed to put a bow on the entire package.

I took many photos that day and have since used them extensively over the last two years.

Fast forward to Tuesday of this week. I asked our CEO to give a promotional piece a final review before sending it to print.

“The detailer looks good. Accurate. But that photo needs replaced. It is terrible,” said our CEO.

“What photo?!” I responded. I work to ensure every print piece that comes out of our office is professionally done and pleasing to the eye.

“The propane one. What do you see when you look at that photo?” he asked.

I studied it.

Propane Fill

“A man delivering propane on a sunny day. A clean truck,” I was quick to remark.

“Weeds! Two weeds. Big weeds. They really stand out,” he responded.
I laughed. “Those aren’t weeds! Those are flowers. That’s part of the landscaping around  the tank. Black eyed Susan’s. They’re just not in bloom,” I defended my use (extensive use over the last two years) of the photo. It had been on every social media channel and used in several print pieces.

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Black eyed Susan

He studied the photo. “Those are weeds. Goldenrod. They need pulled or sprayed.” He was steadfast in his conviction of weed identification and treatment.

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Goldenrod

I asked why, if the photo bothered him and it was used so many times, had he not mentioned it before now? He revealed that he had confidence that I would notice the weeds, remove the picture from things and the problem would be solved. Boy was he wrong!

I was taken back by the misunderstanding, so I tried explaining that the very reason we shot at that particular customer’s home was because it was so well tended.

Well groomed.

Landscaped with colorful details waiting to emerge.

No weeds.

Immaculate.

Our CEO then explained that anyone who sees this photo won’t know that. They only see a guy delivering propane with two big weeds in the way. Our audience didn’t drive up the driveway and see the house, the yard, the barn. They only see the goldenrod (black eyed Susans).

He was right. Unless you know your flowers pre-bloom, these plants looked like weeds.

I appreciated that particular photo because of the natural lighting that day. The clean and well-maintained propane truck. The faceless driver, intentional so no one associated the image with a particular person. The spotless propane tank. And finally, the two flowers awaiting their time to shine.

But unless you were in my shoes – or, the shoes of the homeowner who planted them with intention – you wouldn’t know those were flowers. You may think those were weeds.

It was a classic lesson in perspective: What one person sees, another may not.

That is why it is critically important to value perspectives as we move through life experiences, careers and relationships.

In fact, the key to successful relationships lies solely in our ability to value the perspective of another and find the ability to look at things from a point of view other than our own.

It can be tough, but it can be done.

Is there an area in your personal life, career or relationships that might benefit from a change in perspective?

To step out of your shoes and into another’s?

To ask questions in order to learn, rather than assume? Especially during this time of uncertainty and unpredictability.

Perhaps now is the time. I know that a brief conversation in the corner office earlier this week sure changed the way I’ve thought in the last couple days, and it will continue to do so. I’ll certainly remember this lesson when I am tasked with the job of taking photos or video on behalf of our cooperative.

Now, I’d love to visit more with you about perspective, but I’m spending the rest of the morning replacing the goldenrod (black eyed Susans) photo on every piece of promotional material on which it has appeared.

Spring farm fill

By Lindsay, Communications Manager

 

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Early Season Pest Alert

There are two pests that we’re on high alert for in Indiana and Ohio.

Now is the time to act. 

  • There are numerous fields containing heavy, winter annual weed pressure because they did not get sprayed or tilled last fall, or cover crops have yet to receive a burndown application to kill off prior to planting. These type of field scenarios are a primary target for egg laying moths.
  • Black cutworm will migrate in and feed on anything they can, but they’re easily controlled by synthetic pyrethroids.
  • Wireworms are much tougher to kill and currently they’re attacking seedlings because they’re staying much closer to the surface due to cooler soil temperatures.
  • Synthetic pyrethroids are less effective on wireworms.
  • What must you do now to protect your yield? Watch the video and see –
Join us as seed manager Brandon Lovett visits with Glenn Longabaugh CCA, Winfield United Regional Agronomist, about the damage these two pests can do and how to defend against them.

 

 

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Expectations of Emergence

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In these less than optimal temperatures, what can you expect as far as emergence?
  • Even though temperatures were low at planting time, we will see emergence, though it could take up to three weeks.
  • Calculating growing degree days will help growers understand when they should see growth.
  • What are the early signs of trouble? Watch the video and see –
Join us as seed manager Brandon Lovett visits with Glenn Longabaugh CCA, Winfield United Regional Agronomist, about emergence expectations during these colder temperatures, how to calculate growing degree days and why patience will pay off.

 

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Harvest Land Helping Bulldogs

We were recently approached by a community member who works with Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs, which is a group comprised of the 5 local Centerville Churches.  Prior to the pandemic, the churches were starting a cooperative focused on helping fund after school tutoring for families who could not afford it and to pay off lunch debt for students so they could continue to receive school lunches. When schools closed, they refocused their efforts to feeding students in need.

The Centerville school system received approval to provide 10 meals a week through May 20th. They continue to work alongside schools to provide supplemental food during this school break and now provide fresh and pantry foods one time a week to cover the 11 meals per week not covered by the school.

The need for food has grown weekly and in order to provide supplemental food to over 400 students, their recent cost was approximately $1500. This money purchased fresh and pantry food from Gleaners food bank in Indianapolis.  As long as hungry students come to the distributions, they hope to continue to provide them with food through this time of crisis, but they’re running out of funds.

Harvest Land partnered with Land O’Lakes to contribute $1,500 towards Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs so these students could continue to receive meals for another week. As a farmer-owned co-op, we’re awfully passionate about feeding people, especially those in our hometowns.

If you want to learn more about the Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs program or to make a donation to ensure a meal for a child, we invite you to visit their Facebook page.

We’re operating with many unknowns in the world today, but one thing we believe strongly in is that no child should go hungry. We’re proud to partner with Land O’Lakes and Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs during this time to cultivate communities and keep kids fed.

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EnergyPro Assurance

Our EnergyPro sales team’s milage has slowed quite a bit in the last month for obvious CMC Vertical Tag CMYKreasons. They’re taking quite seriously the health and well-being of their customers and families. EnergyPro customers can rest assured that while you may not see them in the office, at the pump or at the farm gate, they’re still working diligently to provide the highest quality fuel and lubricants to our customers.

This week we invite you to meet the dynamic team members and hear their message regarding the slow in -face-to-face contact.

We invite you to reach out to Jason, Cindy or Mae for your energy needs. The show must go on, and we’re here to help.

Jason Deboo: 765.914.1541, jdeboo@harvestlandcoop.com

Cindy Lee: 765.993.4359, clee@harvestlandcoop.com

Mae McDaniel: 765.748.3636, mmcdaniel@harvestlandcoop.com

 

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Dear Class of 2020

Our 2019 annual report was titled, “Unprecedented” and throughout the publication, we
told the story of how the year was unlike any before, because of a 100-year weather event.

We might want to use that title again for 2020.

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While this is being written, our teams are running full bore to get seed to planters, fertilizer is being spread, burn down is taking off; all of this is being done to support farmers who are taking advantage of a few warm, dry days. Our work is essential, and it continues.

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But we’re not blind to the fact that there is a special group of people who are adjusting to a new normal brought to us by COVID-19.

Hey, Class of 2020: We see you.

You’re disappointed.

You’re disappointed because all the milestone events in your final year of high school are likely not going to happen.

No prom, FFA banquet where you pass the gavel, or senior awards program. No last time hearing your name announced on the baseball field or final dash around the track. Even county and state fairs hang in the balance. The rite of passage events that everyone else has experienced for generations are being sacrificed for safety and that is what makes this catastrophic event so heartbreaking for the Class of 2020.

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Hey, Class of 2020: We see you.

You’re lacking closure.

You’re lacking closure because one day you left the high school excited about an early spring break and expected to return. You expected to still have the opportunity to say goodbye to your favorite teachers, your FFA advisor, your old bus driver and the counselor that helped you complete approximately 99 scholarship applications. You didn’t clean out your locker, or turn in that senior English assignment that was to determine your final grade. You didn’t say goodbye to anyone or anything. You didn’t stand in the shop, the library or the gym one last time and take in that smell of a special place where you spent so many hours. Chapter 12, the very final chapter, of your favorite book has been ripped out and you’ll never get the ending you envisioned in your head.

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Hey, Class of 2020: We see you.

You’re feeling anxious.

Oh, we understand that feeling. This global event has left each of us with more questions than answers. We, too, wish we knew when it was going to be over and life could go back to normal. But remember, you’re used to chaos. In fact, you’ve always grown in chaos. You were born into an unstable world right after September 11, 2001, and in a few months, you’ll move out into another one. New classes, new buildings, new teachers, jobs, friends, advisors, trade school, responsibilities, and schedules.

You’ve got this. You’re going to do great.

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We strangely feel the disappointment right along with you, as we know how important deboo scholarshipthis year of life is. In fact, one of our favorite parts of spring is attending many senior
awards programs and giving scholarships to some awfully deserving ag kids. We’re going to miss saying, “Congratulations” and shaking those hard-working hands this spring; the certificates will have to be mailed.

Hey, Class of 2020: Your graduation, season-ending game, last state FFA contest or final week of high school may look different, but we see you. And by the way, we see your parents and grandparents during this time, too.

 

Barfield Fuel Up

From a local business embedded in dozens of rural communities, we’ve watched you
grow from ornery, curious toddlers who would ask a lot of questions, to awkward pre-teens who ate all of our popcorn at the ag centers and today you’re confident and capable. We’re proud of all you’ve done and all you will go on to do. Do not let this unpredicted turn of events put out that fire for the future that you feel right now.

 

 

 

Let it burn. Keep it bright. Charge ahead.
We say with great confidence that the best is yet to come.

 

2019 Harvest Elite Data

They say that data is only as good as the people who submit it, and we’re proud to declare that our farmer-members who are part of Harvest Elite are top-notch operators, managers, and conservationists.

They stand behind the success found in this program and this week we want to share with you the final data coming out of our 2019 Harvest Elite contest.

Harvest Elite Sell Sheet 2020Harvest Elite Sell Sheet 20202

 

Want to join the fun? Contact your YieldPro Specialist for 2020!

 

Indiana and Ohio: The Differences in Production Ag

National Agriculture Day was Tuesday, March 24 and we want to honor all that Indiana and Ohio agriculture produces.

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This week (and always) we’re celebrating agriculture and in doing so, we’ve created an educational video about Ohio and Indiana that students, parents, and teachers can utilize from home.

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We invite you to watch this clip of Nikki and Julie from our Risk Management department while they have a little friendly competition between the two states.

 

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Essential Work

We’re swimming in uncharted waters, and that statement has absolutely nothing to do with the water standing in the basement of many farmhouses in the area due to the incessant rain.

COVID-19The COVID-19 pandemic has shut down schools, national tournaments, universities,
restaurants, businesses, airlines, libraries and so much more. The financial loss that will
affect nearly every American due to this outbreak could linger for years. And to think, two weeks ago, it seemed to be something only taking place on the other side of the world.

On Tuesday of this week, the first case of COVID-19 was diagnosed at the local hospital and immediately level two travel watch was enforced. Level two means that conditions are threatening to the safety of the public. During a “watch” local travel advisory, only essential travel, such as to and from work or in emergency situations, is recommended, and emergency action plans should be implemented by businesses, schools, government agencies, and other organizations.

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Our leadership team had a long and impassioned conversation regarding our business operations during this extremely fluid time.

The safety of our employees.

How symptoms look or feel.

Long-term planning.

Addressing customer needs during a time of social distancing, a phrase that we’d never heard of seven days ago.

How we take care of business, by taking care of people.

We realized with great certainty: Our work is essential.

Eldorado Plant

When a fuel driver shows up in the morning and loads his truck, he’ll spend the day delivering to tanks that will fill fire trucks, law enforcement vehicles, and semis that will deliver fresh produce or boxed pasta to Kroger.

Barfield Fuel Up

Our work is essential.

When a propane driver comes to work and maps his route for the day, he delivers propane to nursing homes, rural churches, houses on 700 W. that are full of e-learning children and tired parents, and he also fills the tank at the hospital so the generator is operational. Then he goes north and supplies propane to the temperature-controlled hog finishing barns with 1,000 head inside.

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Our work is essential.

When a truck driver loads his semi full of corn and departs the ag center, he is delivering corn to pet food factories so beloved dogs can have food available in a few months. He also delivers feed to turkey farmers who will supply Thanksgiving birds, pork producers who are currently feeding out hogs that will be become the next great plate of bacon and also beef producers who will put hamburgers on the grill over Labor Day weekend.

Handful of grain angus cattle

Our work is essential.

When a YieldPro Specialist drives down the lane of a 100-year-old farmstead and sits at the kitchen table with a grower, he is working with her to map out plans for fertilizer, field work, seed, seed treatment, starter fertilizer, pre-emergence, dormant spray and beyond so that her farm family can supply the food chain and feed the world.

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Our work is essential.

When our IT team shows up to Richmond and enters a room full of wires, technology and computers, they serve as internal problem solvers that ensure farmer-members can pay their bills online during a quarantine, problem solvers that keep phone lines operational to take calls at one of our 40 locations or problem solvers that fix a dispatch glitch in an applicator machine trying to get fungicide on several fields.

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Our work is essential.

When our support staff team shows up to the ag center or office and situates themselves in front of the computer, they’re about to take on a day of processing payments so a family can get propane again in April, paying our bills so the lights stay on here for our continued work and even ensuring our 300 employees get paid at the end of the month.

Our work is essential.

We are not entertainment (though employees’ laughter could argue otherwise on certain days with co-workers at the co-op).

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We are essential.

And we’ll remain operational, working for your family and ours, as long as we’re able.

We are a business that supports the consumer at every angle, and it is a privilege to carry such heavy weight on our shoulders that so many depend on us. We thank you for that opportunity.

Together, we have experienced adversity as an industry, as a nation, and as a world. More importantly, we have always navigated through it –  and we will, again.
Thank you for making our daily work essential.

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You can read more about our commitment to safety here.

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