Grain Rescue Tube Donated in Butler County

Harvest Land recently donated a grain rescue tube to the Milford Township Fire Department in Butler County, Ohio. The department needed the equipment to perform grain rescue should the emergency arise.

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Harvest Land manager Tom study organized the donation.

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Grain rescue training with multiple fire departments in Butler County is set to take place at the College Corner Ag Center later this month. Harvest Land is happy to host such an event that could aid so many in a time of need.

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As part of our Cultivating Communities effort, Harvest Land continues to donate equipment and assist in training to protect farm families in our trade territory.

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2019 Forum Speaker Line-Up

FAKE NEWS.

We’re over it.

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That is why our Winter Innovation Forum brings in the nation’s best presenters to Wayne County, giving you only the facts on the industries that matter most for your business.

We thought today may be a great time to introduce you to the five individuals who will lead the discussions throughout the day on February 20.

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Terry Barr
Senior Director, Knowledge Exchange Division,
CoBank, ACB

Terry Barr, a nationally recognized economist, is senior director for CoBank’s Knowledge Exchange Division, an information-and-knowledge-sharing initiative created in 2009. The division draws upon the expertise and insights of experts inside CoBank as well as those of its customers and other third-party experts and professionals in the industries it serves.

Previously, Dr. Barr served as chief economist for the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives in Washington, DC from 1985 to 2009. Prior to joining NCFC, Terry held several positions during a 14-year tenure at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He served as chairman of the World Agricultural Outlook Board, which is responsible for coordinating USDA’s commodity forecasts and for publishing its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates. He also served in the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture as director of economic analysis. Terry holds a doctorate in economics from Washington State University.


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Chuck Conner
President and CEO, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives

Charles F. (Chuck) Conner became president & CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives (NCFC) on January 22, 2009. As president of NCFC, Conner will oversee the organization’s work to promote and protect the business and public policy interests of America’s farmer-owned cooperatives. He will also provide the strategic vision for the trade association as it continues to seek new ways in which to add value for its membership.

Prior to joining NCFC, Conner had served as the Deputy Secretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture since mid-2005. In this capacity, he was the Chief Operating Officer (COO) overseeing day-to-day operations of the department. Conner interacted directly with President George W. Bush and his senior staff to formulate domestic and international food, trade, security and energy policy. He led development of the Bush Administration’s $300 billion Farm Bill proposal and the strategy to educate and inform industry, constituents and Congress.

From August 2007 to January 2008, Conner served as both USDA Secretary and Deputy Secretary. He played a key role in developing the Administration’s immigration policy including important changes to the H2A program.

Conner’s experience also includes the assignment of Special Assistant to the President, Executive Office of the President, from October 2001 to May 2005, working on the 2001/2 Farm Bill to develop the strategy behind the transfer of several USDA agency functions to the newly formed Department of Homeland Security. From May 1997 to October 2001 Conner served as President of the Corn Refiners Association. He also served for 17 years as an advisor to U.S. Senator Richard Lugar of Indiana.

Conner is a graduate of Purdue University, with a Bachelor’s of Science degree and is the recipient of Purdue’s Distinguished Alumni Award. He and his wife Dru have four children.


Steve Dlugosz, CCA, Agronomist, Harvest Land Co-opDlugosz

Steve Dlugosz received a BS in Agronomy from Purdue University in 1980, and a MS in Entomology from Purdue University in 1991. He started his career as an Area IPM Extension specialist for Purdue, and worked an eleven county area of southwest Indiana. In 1985, he went to work for Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Inc. He has held various agronomic positions within the Cooperative system over the years of industry consolidation, and is currently the Lead Agronomist for Harvest Land Co-op.

Steve has been heavily involved in the CCA program since its inception, and has served in a number of leadership roles including Chairman of the International CCA Board in 2006. Steve has also served on a number of agricultural and industry boards and committees over the years. In 1997 he was appointed by the Governor of Indiana to serve on the Indiana Pesticide Review Board and currently serves today. He testified before two different Congressional Committees on Agriculture in 2005 and again in 2010


dysleTodd Dysle, UAN Products Manager, CHS

Todd Dysle has had a 31-year career in the Crop Nutrient industry, working for a retail/wholesale fertilizer distributor. He has spent more than 10 years with two international trading companies. Dysle joined CHS in 2008 as the Product Manager for UAN (Nitrogen Solutions) and has since handled all crop nutrients at one time or another. Today he manages the UAN and the Ammonia books

It with great fondness that Dysle shares his fertilizer business experience with you today. He has witnessed many industry changes over the years and very much enjoys sharing that information with farmers.

Todd Dysle was raised on an Ohio dairy farm where his passion for agriculture was ignited. He went on to serve as a State FFA Officer and then received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University. Dysle went on to be a Farm Broadcaster for 10 years and also a part time grain farmer.

Dysle has lived with his wife Paula in the Tampa, FL area the past 18 years. In his spare time he enjoys travel, golf, and his two granddaughters who reside in Ohio.


smith-charlie-091504Charlie Smith,
President/CEO
CountryMark

Charlie Smith is President and CEO of CountryMark Cooperative Holding Corp. (CountryMark). CountryMark’s operations encompass oil exploration and production, refining, and distribution-refined products to its branded retailers. Charlie began his career with the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) where he held a number of petroleum-related assignments in Houston, Anchorage and Dallas. In 1991, he joined a leading international petroleum consulting firm where he became Vice President and Director, managing the firm’s Mergers & Acquisitions practice. Charlie joined CountryMark in his current capacity in January 2003. Charlie holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Purdue University and is a graduate of the Hoosier Fellows program at Indiana University’s Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence. He also is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas. Charlie served eight years on the Advisory Board of the new Indiana State Department of Agriculture for which he received the Partner in Progress Award from Lt. Governor Becky Skillman. He currently serves on the Board of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, the Board of Advisors for Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business (Indianapolis), the Board of the Michigan Oil and Gas Association, and the Industry Advisory Council for Purdue University’s School of Chemical Engineering. Charlie recently received the 2015 Purdue University School of Chemical Engineering’s Outstanding Chemical Engineer Award.


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If you attend one meeting this winter, make it this one.
All the experts, in one place, on one day.
NO FAKE NEWS.

REGISTER NOW

Let’s Talk Seed.

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A few points to get the conversation started:

  • Seed Treatments – As commodity pricing has declined, in some cases growers have looked for ways to decrease input cost.  Seed Treatment has changed in some operations.  Seed treatment will not increase the germination of the “LOT”, however, it will increase the chances that each viable seed will become a “productive member of society”.
  • Populations: For many years we have overpopulated soybeans in Indiana and Ohio.  We have made a concerted effort to reduce planting populations over the last several years.  However, the 2019 year may not be the year to look at reducing plant populations.
  • Ownership – The best LOTs will be treated by Brands, best quality and highest Germ out the door first.  The only way to ensure the quality and Germ % of your soybeans is to OWN the product and have it on your floor. Harvest Land highly recommends that you take possession of product.
  • Replants are NEVER a good situation. – All above-mentioned situations will be included in FIRST plant units.  Many years we only really have one chance to do it Right.
Click below to watch Agronomist Steve Dlugosz and Seed Manager, Brandon Lovett, talk about seed treatment, populations, ownership and replant.

 

 

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Harvest Land Brings Home Ag Volunteer, Corporation of the Year

The Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce had their 2019 Annual Dinner last week and Harvest Land represented the agriculture industry well in front of a crowd of nearly 600. The annual event honors the top businesses, volunteers and community leaders.

Harvest Land’s own Danielle Baumer, Human Resources, won the award for Agribusiness Committee Volunteer of the Year.  The mission of the Agribusiness Committee is to promote agriculture as a major segment of the local economy, lead community efforts regarding agribusiness and economic development, and unite and network groups and activities to address issues important to agriculture.

We asked Danielle about the tremendous honor (she serves on the committee with ag lenders, business owners, insurance representatives, implement dealers, and more) and she had this to say:

I am honored to have received this award, especially within our county where agriculture is not only an essential part of our economy, but also the passion and livelihood of so many. It has been an absolute pleasure to serve on the Agribusiness committee; not only to advocate for Ag within our county (and beyond), but also to have the opportunity to meet so many new faces who also share the same love and passion for ag that many of us do here at Harvest Land Co-op. I am delighted to have the opportunity to assist in representing our Co-op alongside Lindsay, and hope to continue serving for many years to come.

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 Pictured with Baumer is Lee Elzmeyer, outgoing Chamber Board Chairman

Later in the evening, Harvest Land was named Corporation of the Year. This award represents the highest recognition given by the Chamber to a business/corporation. What an honor to be recognized as the business that most exemplifies being a good corporate citizen of the community.  We join a prestigious group of previous winners such as Reid Health, Belden, Hills Pet Nutrition, Richmond Baking and more. Since the award began in 1993, Harvest Land is the first agricultural company to be honored.

It is truly an honor to be recognized by the Chamber as 2019 Corporation of the Year. Much of our work in the last decade has been telling the story of agriculture to those who are not directly involved. Our relationship with the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce has supported those efforts greatly, and we very much appreciate being recognized amongst our peers. Harvest Land is nearly 100 years old, and we will continue to serve the east central Indiana community through our hard-working farmer-members for generations to come.  – Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO

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Lindsay Sankey, Communications Manager, accepts the award for Corporation of the Year on behalf of Harvest Land

While our home base in Wayne County isn’t necessarily rural, a large part of our efforts on NW 5th Street is finding ways to educate the public about agriculture and continue our commitment to cultivating communities. We’re honored to be recognized, not only for our business operations in Wayne County but also through the outstanding people we employ.

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Tracks in the Snow

“A perfect weekend to stay inside and warm,” the meteorologist said on the morning newscast earlier this week. I couldn’t agree more. Rain, followed by several inches of snow, followed by a cold front predicted to grip the midwest and east.

As I was making chili, wearing the new wool socks I got for Christmas and making another cup of hot chocolate for the little one in the living room, I noticed how perfect the snow across our yard already was. We hadn’t had memorable snow in some time. It seemed it was finally winter. Winter is sure pretty from the picture window.

Hours later I was folding clothes upstairs when I noticed the perfectly imperfect snow in front of our house. There were tracks I’d not noticed before.

You see, while I was enjoying our warm home, hot chocolate, wool socks and a picture-perfect scene from my warm home, someone came and filled our fuel oil tank without me even knowing.

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How differently those strapped with the responsibility of heating homes, businesses, schools, and churches must view winter from the rest of us.

I was thinking of how pretty the snow looked, he was probably thinking how it makes pulling a hose just a bit tougher.

I was thinking of my feet getting too warm in my new wool socks and he was probably img_2001thinking that he should have left the house at 5:30 this morning with another pair.

I was thinking of chili and hot chocolate on my menu, he was probably wondering if he could scarf down his cold meat sandwich on the way to the next house.

I was thinking that it was a great weekend to stay home, and he was out making sure every home on his route was safe and warm.

I was thinking of a weekend with no plans, he was thinking that he’ll be on-call all weekend for those who need a fill.

This weekend – and always – we salute the many Harvest Land fuel truck and propane drivers who put in extra hours when school is canceled, businesses close early or roads are unpassable.

It is when we are safe and warm at home

that this team suits up and goes to battle.

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Many thanks to the fuel and propane drivers, service technicians, support staff and part-time crew for stepping in on these bitterly cold days to serve our communities and families. We appreciate your tremendous effort in keeping us warm.

 

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785 Years of Service

785 years.

That is the total number of years of service our 2018 honorees have dedicated to Harvest Land Co-op. Annually we recognize employees by five-year increments and thank them for their continued work on our cooperative’s behalf. At the Christmas party in December, we recognized the following individuals.

According to an Economic News Release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics in November 2018,  the average number of years that wage and salary workers have worked for their current employer is currently 4.6 years. With that statistic, we’re quite proud to honor the following folks for their commitment to Harvest Land.

Note that not all honorees were in attendance. 

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Five Years

Five Years of Service:

Teri Dunlavy Richmond
Kipp Huth Junction LP
Shannon Bodey Lena Ag
Sara Nave Lena Ag
Kyle Brooks Central Crops
Brigette Mauck North Crops-Durbin
Troy Bane YieldPro
Tim Hammond YieldPro
Curt Naylor Reg. Mgr./Seed
Garet Ribel Decatur
Cindy Kay Richmond Energy
Tim Gibbs Kalmbach
James Thompson Versailles
Nicole Pyott Risk Dept.
10
Ten Years

Ten Years of Service:

Steve Miller West Liquid Fuels
Darren Klein Pershing
Jeff Riester Central Crops
Tiffany Miller Rushville
Robert Moore Rushville
David Williams Rushville
Mike Hartsock Rushville
John Rines Limberlost
Royce Kukelhan Limberlost
Joe Werling Williams
Dennis Mount Ohio Energy
Terry Miller Ohio Energy
15
Fifteen Years

Fifteen Years of Service:

Mike Klein Hagerstown
Lance Eyler Transportation
Mark Smith R&F
20
Twenty Years

Twenty Years of Service:

Vickie Fleenor Richmond
Duane Brooks Hagerstown
Henry Branscum Jr. Monroe LF
Mike Reed YieldPro
Bob Newhouse Director
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Twenty-Five Years

Twenty-Five Years of Service:

Michael Chalfant Junction LP
Jay Scharnowske Junction LP
Tim Lanman Pershing
Ivan Brumbaugh Transportation
Greg Hayes Richmond LF
Jeff Osborn Richmond LP
Todd Duncan Ohio Energy
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Thirty Years

Thirty Years of Service:

Susan Metzger Randolph Ag
Jamie Cressman Decatur
Brian Becker Director
Tom Tucker Director

Thirty-Five Years of Service:

Brent Stang West LF
David Taylor YieldPro
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Forty Years

Forty Years of Service:

Mark Garretson North Crops
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Forty-Five Years

And finally, Forty-Five Years of Service:

Stan Hicks Richmond

We asked Stan Hicks, our Chief Operations Officer, about his forty-five years at Harvest Land. Here are a few words from him:

“It’s been amazing to look back over the years and see how the farmers within our trade territory have banned together, consolidated their 19 co-ops into one very solid cooperative and established an organization that works for their long-term well-being in the agricultural community.”

 

“The Cooperative System has been for me, and many others, a long-term career in the field of agriculture when the means were not afforded to be a farmer that planted, harvested and marketed their own production.”

We offer sincere thanks to Stan and all others who celebrated another year with Harvest Land. We truly appreciate you.

 

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2018 Salute to Service Winner: John Bell

In February we invited you to send us stories of the positive encounters or experiences you have with Harvest Land employees for our Salute to Service program. We asked you to share with us the instance of an employee going above and beyond, someone handling a difficult assignment with professionalism or an employee representing Harvest Land in an oustanding way.

We received 60 nominations from Harvest Land customers and employees nominating their peers.  This was an amazing response to a simple ask! But it made our job difficult. We closed nominations in November and then asked our employee base to read through all nominations and choose their top three choices to win the 2018 Salute to Service Award.

At our cooperative Christmas party on December 8 the winner was announced. Today we want to share with you the winner:

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John is a fuel driver out of our Greenville, Ohio location.

The winning submission:

“I was visiting my Grandma in early fall when John Bell arrived to fill her fuel tank. In her older age (she’s 88 and in poor health) Grandma is extremely paranoid about running out of fuel. She was so glad to see John pull down the farm lane. John topped off her tank, then came in to reassure her that he wouldn’t let her run out of fuel, ever. John could have left the ticket in the door and went about his business, but he stepped inside Grandma’s kitchen to check on her, ask her how she is feeling, then assure her fuel level was fine – even better now that he topped it off! As her granddaughter, I truly appreciate the time he took to deal with an 88-year-old lady who spends much of her day worrying. John was kind, reassuring and very pleasant. He represents Harvest Land so well and he made me proud to be associated with the cooperative.” Submitted by Lindsay Sankey

Below are five more nominations that were submitted on John’s behalf. In fact, not only did the above get the greatest number of votes, but John also had the most individual nominations!

“John Goes above and beyond for the company” Submitted by Doug Fark

“I’m writing to nominate John Bell (Greenville, OH Terminal) for your Salute to Service program. I’ve been with Trans Alliance, LLC in Greenville, OH for 6 years now, and for 5 of those years I’ve been handling the bulk fuel purchase and delivery. John looks out for our company like he is one of our employee’s. We receive fuel 3-4 times per week, but I feel it’s safe to say that John is probably here at least 5 days a week taking measurements to make sure we haven’t had an influx in fueling that could empty our tank. Numerous Bellconversations have been had with John that he checked our tank the previous night, after everyone had left, never wanting us to run out. If he didn’t have the fuel on his truck that night, he’d make sure that we were the first stop the following morning. This means a lot to our company, me personally, and our drivers always know they’ll be able to fuel up at the yard. When John comes into our office to get a receipt signed, he says “Hello” to everyone,
and usually by name. Now I understand I deal with John on a daily basis, and it should be pretty easy to remember my name, but to say hello to the other 10 employees here at Trans Alliance by name is very impressive. As he leaves, a “See Ya/Have a good day” is said before he walks out the door. Reliability is a huge reason I feel John should be recognized for your program. As stated above, we always know they’ll be fuel in the tank. But I’ve called John on his cell many times with issues or questions, and he always answers when I 
call or returns the call ASAP! If we’ve got an issue with our tank or reader, he’s out there with tools in hand to try and fix it himself. Thanks to Harvest Land and John Bell for providing the quality fuel that keeps the trucks of Trans Alliance going down the road 365 days a year!” Submitted by Cory J. Griesdorn, TransAlliance

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“I would like to submit the name of John Bell to receive an award for service beyond the call of duty. I believe he deserves the Salute to Service Award. Last winter, shortly after we had a new furnace installed, we woke up one morning with no heat. We called the furnace installation and they sent out a service man to check the furnace. He checked the furnace and could not find anything wrong. He checked our oil tank outside the house and said we were low on oil and the oil might be frozen and to call our oil delivery man. We called John Bell and he came out and checked our oil tank and found we were not low enough with oil to affect the furnace. He filled our tank but we still didn’t have any heat. He bled the oil line and we had heat after the house was really cold. He didn’t have to do this but he knew we needed heat. He stayed with us until we the house warm.” Submitted by Arthur Glover

“We nominate John Bell our Fuel Delivery Guy! John has shown his loyalty to Haves Land Coop by serving in a prompt manner whenever we call him for special delivery times it always seems like we are the next on his list or he is just around the corner. He has been pleasant and friendly. He has been very willing to iron out mistakes that we have produced and mistakes the Coop has produced. I hope your management team finds him in this manner also.” Submitted by David and Shari Harms

“I’d like to nominate John Bell as an employee to be commended on a job well done. John has serviced the property I live at for longer than I’ve owned it. Without a moment of hesitation, he remembered the property when I called him out of the blue to set up the first oil delivery. I find that remarkable given that he more than likely services hundreds of properties in the area. To date, John has consistently delivered within a few days of calling (as he always promises) and is very professional in his procedures. He offers advice when I ask questions and even offered to replace the oil tank gauges on my tanks for free. Again, John is an outstanding employee, please put him in for this wonderful ‘Salute to Service’ prize as he deserves to win every bit of it.” Submitted by Joshua Wilson

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John pictured with Harvest Land President/CEO Scott Logue. John’s prize is $1,000 cash and two vacation days.

Congratulations to John!

We’re proud to have you represent our cooperative so well in the countryside.

We offer sincere thanks for all who nominated an employee for this program. reading through the submissions is one of the most gratifying things about working for your local farmer-owned cooperative.

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A Harvest Land Christmas Story

With Christmas just days away, this Friday we wanted to publish a story that was shared with us, not by a customer, but by the daughter of a customer. This was actually a nomination for our Salute to Service program. While we’ve not announced the 2018 winner on our blog yet, we thought this week was a perfect time to share the story of Brian Henderson.

We received the following in the mail:

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This is a copy of a handwritten letter by my 92-year-old mother, Charlotte Bailey. A handwritten letter is rare anymore, but Brian Henderson went above and beyond to help Hendersonher and she wants you to know about it. His actions also helped me, her daughter. I do my best to care for her, but I struggle from some serious health problems and Brian’s intervention was a Godsend for us both.

It might be hard to read so I will type it out for you:

“It was a blustery, cold Saturday before Christmas Day on Monday. The thermometer was dropping and the little old lady (these are her words not mine) who lived back the lane began to wonder, “Is there enough fuel oil to last through the cold weekend weather until Tuesday when Harvest Land would be open?” So she called Harvest Land hoping someone would be at the office to help – she got a recorded message: “Open Tuesday.”

In a few moments, her phone rang. Someone had intercepted her call and a sympathetic voice inquired about the problem and the little old lady explained her anxiety. Within anFuel Delivery hour on that windy Saturday evening, a Harvest Land fuel truck drove up the icy lane. The driver jumped out with wind and freezing rain hitting his face and with kindness and caring took care of the low oil worry for the little old lady back the lane. _DSC0719


Thank you so much Brian Henderson, for your big-hearted caring on a cold Christmas weekend. This is a truly happy Christmas story.”

In this world where so often a company puts their focus on their bottom line, it’s great you are recognizing your hard-working employees. Please thank Brian on our behalf and award him this honor from your company. He truly touched my mom’s heart and deserves this. Her name is Charlotte Bailey.

Submitted by Charlotte Bailey and Lori Stone (daughter of  the little old lady who lives back the lane)

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From you friends and neighbors at Harvest Land,

we wish you a very Merry Christmas. 

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Adjuvants: A Necessary​ Investment​

Our Shop Talks series has become popular because it provides candid conversation on real issues in the field, and provides timely insight on addressing them.

We’ve gotten a lot of questions about adjuvants and their value. This week, join R & F Ag Center Manager Tom Barfield and Agronomist Steve Dlugosz as they discuss the value of adjuvants.

  • Any herbicide label will have specific requirements for an adjuvant that is necessary for the herbicide to work properly.
  • It is important to remember that price is directly correlated with quality.
  • All adjuvants are not created equal.

Watch the video to learn more!

Your YieldPro Specialist is ready to talk. Contact them to learn more.

 

 

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