Photo Friday: Propane Safety in Hancock County

We do crop protection.

We do premium diesel fuel.

We do grain marketing.

We do soil sampling.

We do lubricants.

We also do education.

Four different  Hancock County fire departments recently practiced fire fighting techniques that could be used in residential or propane transport leaks or fires. Harvest Land applauds the efforts of these departments for being prepared for any emergency.  Propane for the training was donated by Harvest Land.

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Twelve days ago we were experiencing a summer that didn’t want to go to bed and 80 degree temperatures. Today, fall temperatures have moved in and propane is in demand as folks begin to heat their homes for the cold winter that lies ahead.

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Harvest Land  makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business. All propane employees attend a monthly safety meeting to receive education and refresher training on safety topics.

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Propane is a safe fuel source if precautions are taken and safety devices are in place. Harvest Land makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business.

Here is a quick refresher from our website on propane safety:

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We’re proud to supply propane to training events such as this, if it means that safety awaits on the opposite end.

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The Farmer

Today, October 12, is National Farmers Day. While we prefer to celebrate agriculture and the farmers who feed us daily (actually, three times a day – sometimes more if we need a snack), a single fall day in the middle of harvest is alright for celebrating them, too.

America’s farmers are the backbone of our economy and essential to global food security.

Today we share with you The Farmer, by Amelia Barr (1831-1919).

 

 

The Farmer

The king may rule o’er land and sea,

The lord may live right royally,

The soldier ride in pomp and pride,

The sailor roam o’er ocean wide;

But this or that, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The writer thinks, the poet sings,

The craftsmen fashion wondrous things,

The doctor heals, the lawyer pleads,

The miner follows the precious leads;

But this or that, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The merchant he may buy and sell,

The teacher do his duty well;

But men may toil through busy days,

Or men may stroll through pleasant ways;

From king to beggar, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The farmer’s trade is one of worth;

He’s partner with the sky and earth,

He’s partner with the sun and rain,

And no man loses for his gain;

And men may rise, or men may fall,

But the farmer he must feed them all.

God bless the man who sows the wheat,

Who finds us milk and fruit and meat;

May his purse be heavy, his heart be light,

His cattle and corn and all go right;

God bless the seeds his hands let fall,

For the farmer he must feed us all.

 

 

Thank you, Farmers

 

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A Salute to the Unsung Harvest Heroes

Harvest is running on all cylinders across the United States. It’s easy for us to highlight the  tremendously important work the farmer does to harvest another crop to feed the general public, but what about those unsung heroes who work behind the scenes (or, wheel) to ensure harvest work goes as it should?

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Today we salute the harvest unsung heroes:

The unsung harvest heroes are the ones blowing out filters, checking oil and greasing every piece of equipment before the race gets started.

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The unsung harvest heroes spend time thinking up meals that can be eaten with one hand, transported effortlessly or used to feed the masses on the tailgate of a farm truck. They’re the ones who prepare meals with hurried love, deliver meals on time and don’t think about feeding themselves until 10:30 PM.

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The unsung harvest heroes take different route home from school every day so the future farmers can see where Grandpa or Dad are working.

The unsung harvest heroes are the fuel truck drivers who work tirelessly to fuel all of the combines, tractors, and semi trucks running the products up and down the road. They still answer their phone when a customer calls from the field at 9:00 PM, and takes off to deliver a load in the middle of a field so not to slow progress.

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The unsung harvest heroes act as a morning motivator when the future farmer presents his best argument for skipping school and riding in the combine all day.

The unsung harvest hero doesn’t understand what all the hype is over a pumpkin spiced latte. And until her town of 2,000 puts a Starbucks next to the parts store or grain elevator, she probably never will.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the ones hauling the grain to the elevator, spending their day wearing a path on the rural route roads, waiting in line, and eating their weight in co-op popcorn.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the people in charge of logistics, making sure that pick-up trucks get from field to field in order to get the farmers home each night if equipment is being left in the field over night.

The unsung harvest heroes are the ones driving the auger cart, positioning it perfectly for the effortless unload so the big wheels can keep on turning.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the “runners” who log 200 miles on their vehicle in a single October day and never leave the county.

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And finally, the unsung harvest heroes are the ones who spend a large amount of time traveling 15 mph with their flashers on, following equipment at night and ensuring everyone – and every piece of equipment – makes it home safely.
We salute you, harvest’s unsung heroes, for working the odd jobs that no one sees but everyone needs.
Keep trucking towards a safe and bountiful harvest 2018.
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Unique Training Tool

Harvest Land’s Risk Management Department has a new training tool for employee training, as well as first responders and emergency agencies within our trade territory.

It was built from an anhydrous ammonia nurse wagon tank that was taken out of service due to a defect. We had two inspection windows cut into the side of the tank so trainees can see and understand the mechanics of an anhydrous ammonia nurse wagon.

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The Lynn Ag Center Shop Crew, headed by Mike Whitney, sand blasted, painted, plumbed and mounted the tank for demonstrations. In the first week the tank was used at a County Emergency Management training function in Greenfield, IN.

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We’d like to thank employees Bill Davenport, Adam Culy, Mike Kress and the other employees who spent many hours making this training equipment look professional.

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Pictured from left to right: Mike Kress, Jake Bottoms, Mike Whitney, Brian Stump and Chandler Grogan

You can check out this educational display at our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum to be held in Richmond on Wednesday, February 20!

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The Big Reveal: Fall Application

Harvest 2018 is rapidly approaching and it’s almost time to reveal the results of what we’ve been working toward all season long.

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The season is coming to an end, so now is the time to prepare for next years crop.  With great success comes great stress.  In high yielding fields, make sure you return those nutrients removed back to the soil.

Fall is the time to replace what was lost with a strong fertility plan by taking advantage weather and time restraints.  Not to mention less risk for compaction!

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Talk to your local ag center or YieldPro Specialist to get ahead this harvest season.

 

 

Find the Helpers: Lynn, Indiana

As this entry is being written, the country awaits news on the arrival of Hurricane Florence entering the United States and pounding the east coast in unprecedented ways. From states away, we watch the news coverage to see residents evacuating the area and others staying in their homes, preparing for the unimaginable.

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Coverage has included communities coming together to help one another before the worse even arrives. We’ve seen families, teams, and towns boarding windows and doors, delivering supplies, filling sand bags and beyond.

That is the positive side of disaster or hard times: Finding the helpers:

Harvest Land recently acted as helpers, in our own back yard:

On Friday, September 7,  Lynn, Indiana received heavy rains dumping a couple inches on the rural community in less then an hour. This was followed by a lighter, steady rain that lasted several hours.

At 5:07 PM, an alert went out to Lynn residents asking for help filling sandbags. That call was answered by Randolph Ag Center in Lynn who provided a front end loader and an operator to assist in the efforts.

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Finally, at approximately 9:00 PM Friday night, two dump truck loads of sand – 1,000 bags – had been bagged, stacked and positioned for residents’ use.

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Our hope is certainly that we never need disaster preparation or relief, but if we do, we’ll continue to be a part of taking care of the communities in which we live and work however we’re able as your local, farmer-owned cooperative.

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Dave Naylor helped employees of Randolph Ag .   Derek is a volunteer fireman so he was there automatically and Dave Naylor took the Kubota down to help load sand and move skids loaded with the sandbags.  It initially started on Friday Sept 7 with 40 tons of sand bagged  and with over 10 + inches of rain that fell within Randolph county they bagged another 40 tons of sand and over 1000 sandbags available.  Area businesses including Lynn Lions Club, Diamond K Pizza and Hometown Coffee supplied food to the volunteers.

Winter Warmth: Now Is the Time

We hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if you changed your calendar seven days ago, you should already know: Winter is coming.

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While we’re still hitting the 90-degree mark in Indiana and Ohio, it won’t be long until the autumn chill sets in and harvest is running full speed ahead. Before we get to that point, we want to remind you that now is the perfect time to plan ahead, be prepared and consider a budget payment plan for heating your home, shop and business this winter.

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We take pride in providing propane and fuel oil to heat homes and businesses throughout eastern Indiana and western Ohio. Safety for our customers is our top priority. This is why each of our propane professionals are CETP trained and certified.

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Programs

Automatic Fill – This program takes the worry of running out of product off of your mind. Harvest Land will keep track of the product level in your tank for you.

Budget – This program allows you to make monthly payments on the product you use.
Guaranteed Price, Prepay and Budget Programs available to suit your needs. Contact us to learn more!

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They say when you’re dying of thirst it is far too late to think about digging a well – the same can be said for heating your home!

Contact Harvest Land today to get your family taken care of before Old Man Winter shows up at your doorstep.

 

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2018 Habitat for Humanity Build

Earlier this month Harvest Land employees traded office hours for hammers and worked on the Habitat For Humanity house at the Indiana State Fair. Our cooperative partnered with Land O’Lakes and four other farmer-owned co-ops throughout Indiana to make progress on this house which will benefit a local family in need.

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Tiffany Miller and Kent VanMeter from Rushville, Royce Cook from Mt. Summit, Troy Miley from Richmond and Curt Naylor, Region Manager all represented Harvest Land.

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“I feel like it’s our obligation to be supportive in our communities and help people who are in need. As a farmer-owned company, we should give back.” says Scott Logue, Harvest Land CEO.

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Their devoted time to community service proves that we can all cultivate communities in different ways, even if not directly in our back yard.

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Each year, in partnership with the Indiana State Fair, Habitat for Humanity builds two houses during the two weeks of the State Fair, all on the fairgrounds. For a day of home building, sponsors are asked to make a $10,000 donation to Habitat for Humanity. This is not a small donation so it makes a big difference that member cooperatives Ceres Solutions, North Central, Harvest Land, Co-Alliance and Premier Companies were able to work together to share in the cost.

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We very much appreciate these five and their commitment to serving others and representing Harvest Land’s values well in Indianapolis. We’re proud of the work they did on behalf of our co-op.

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Photo Friday: 2018 Answer Plot

Our 2018 Answer Plot, held on August 15 at our Pershing Plot, had a tremendous turnout. We were excited to spend the morning with our farmer-owners to offer agronomic insight and technology updates to so many.

This Photo Friday covers the event. Enjoy a look at the day:

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All photos taken by Dusty Mayberry, Support Staff at our Mt. Summit location. We’re grateful for her many talents!

 

Indiana State Fair Featured Farmers: Wehr Farms

Harvest Land is quite fortunate to work with numerous outstanding family farm operations in Indiana and Ohio. Annually we look forward to learning who the State Fair Featured Farmers are, because there is a high probability we work closely with one of two of them.

What an honor to be named an Indiana State Fair Featured Farmer. In its fourth year, this program celebrates and helps put a face on Hoosier agriculture by connecting consumers with farmers. The 17 farm operations selected in 2018 represent all regions of the state, showcasing different agricultural products throughout the 17-day fair, August 3-19.

Visitors to the Indiana State Fair can attend a live chat at the Glass Barn with a Featured Farmer every day of the fair, in addition to many other opportunities to talk with that day’s Featured Farm family and learn about their operation.

On August 19 the Featured Farmer is Wehr Farms from Fayette County. Monica Wehr is a  former FieldTech intern for Harvest Land, and is currently an ACE participant. Monica has been an outstanding asset to our cooperative and we very much appreciate her work ethic and passion for production agriculture.

This week, we invite you to learn more about the Wehr sisters from Fayette County and their drive to manage the family farm despite loss.

Wehr Sisters Take Family Farm Reins and Move Forward

It’s said strength of character is measured by how one reacts to adverse events or actions. It’s about doing what’s right or ethical even when that is the most difficult path to take. For Wehr sisters Monica, 21, and Morgan, 18, a career in farming was always a possibility – a “some day in the future” career aspiration. A year ago, “some day” became today for the Connersville, Indiana, sisters who grew up on the family farm their grandfather founded in 1953 and their father later took over.

“Farming is something I’ve loved since I was little. I was always with my dad and my grandpa even when I probably should have been at home and out of their hair,” says Monica. “I never expected to be running the farm this soon, but everything happens for a reason I guess.”

When their father unexpectedly died in June of 2017, the young sisters found themselves running their family’s farm with the help of their grandmother.

 

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“With our grandpa and dad both gone, there was no other option for us than to continue our family legacy,” says Morgan. Their resiliency is apparent in their day-to-day management of the hay farm and cow-calf operation that includes three bulls and 50 head of Angus and Angus-Charolais cross cattle.

All cattle are bred and raised on the farm until calves reach about 500 pounds. They are then sold as feeder cattle to a neighboring farmer. “We turn the bulls out July 4 and have calves starting the second week of April. We have about 50 calves born each year,” says Monica.

“When we wean calves, we use some supplemental feed to add more nutrients to their diet,” she says. “We graze nine months out of the year. The cows are never contained. They roam the pasture at will.” She points out “Our cows have a pretty good life. Our cattle are never mistreated. Calves get to roam with their moms in the pasture, and they are fed the high-quality hay we produce.”

The sisters also farm 185 acres of alfalfa and orchard grass with the help of Mitchell Pohlar, Monica’s fiancée, who was raised on his family’s nearby farm and now spends his days working at the Wehr’s farm.

They feed some of the hay to their cattle and sell the rest to area farmers.  “We’ve had the same three hay buyers for the past four years. They know the quality of our hay, and they come back for more every year,” says Monica.

The Wehr sisters continue their formal studies as well.  Monica is a student at Wilmington College in Ohio and Morgan graduates from high school in 2018 and is headed to Oklahoma State University this fall where she plans to major in agricultural education, where her hands-on learning will no doubt be beneficial.

“We grew up farming, accompanying our dad and grandpa to the crop fields and to the pastures for a great education,” says Monica.

As they triumph over adversity, Morgan reflects on the example set for them.  “Dad, grandma and grandpa set us up for success. Grandma has spent many hard hours out on the tractor, too, over the years.”

 

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Source: Indiana State Fair