Benefits of Early Season Fungicide Application

Disease can threaten corn production throughout the season, from common diseases that affect leaves, stalks and roots.

This week, Harvest Land agronomist Steve Dlugosz takes a look at the benefits of early season fungicide application and shares the results of a field box trial done last season that yielded some interesting results. Take a look:

Infection by stalk rot organisms can occur early in the season, but visual symptoms may not appear until grain fill. Stalk rots can cause significant yield loss when the disease causes plants to deteriorate prematurely, resulting in poor ear fill or light test weight grain. Lodging can be a problem and everyone hates running down corn!

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So how can you manage these problems? What can you do to protect your crop from disease? Best management practices can help. Ask yourself these four questions:

Which disease(s) is it?

Many Corn diseases are caused by fungi, especially gray leaf spotand northern corn leaf blightsouthern corn leaf blight.  Also most of the ears rots which were a big problem a few seasons ago.

An increasing concern is southern rust which is carried by wind-borne fungal spores and commonly affect seed corn and sweet corn. Timely fungicide applications can help control these diseases.

What hybrids are a concern?

Current hybrids vary greatly in their resistant to many diseases.  Know the strength and weaknesses of the hybrids you have planted. Talk to your YieldPro Specialist if you don’t know.

How do my current cultural practices affect disease?

Because several disease organisms survive in infected residue from crop to crop, there are several cultural practices that can help break this cycle and diminish disease pressure. For example:

  • Crop rotation allows surface corn residue to break down, reducing bacteria and fungal inoculum.
  • Incorporating corn residue into the soil can further reduce the disease pressure the following season.
  • Good weed control removes disease hosts.

When should I use a fungicide?

A fungicide decision is a matter of evaluating the risk actors that drive disease development, including the hybrids you planted, rotation, disease history, and current and future weather patterns.

Timely foliar fungicide applications are a tool that can help protect corn plants from fungal YieldPro_4Cinfections throughout the season. Your YieldPro Specialist can help when making these decisions.

Applying fungicides with multiple modes of action, such as Delaro™ and Stratego® YLD can help minimize the potential for fungicide resistance, which can occur when heavy reliance is placed on controlling diseases with one chemical class.

Contact your YieldPro Specialist today to get the most out of your yield in 2018. We’re always here to help.

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Cultivating Communities: Hazardous Materials Plan in Ohio

As spring plant and side dress has slowed down, we’ve been Cultivating Communities and promoting safety in Ohio.

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The Local Emergency Planning Committees, through the state direction of SERC (State Emergency Response Commission), requires each county to have an exercise of the hazardous materials plan each year.  The Hazardous Materials Plan is made up of the Tier II reports that we do every spring, as well as a hazard analysis.  Every county has to demonstrate each one of the three types of emergencies; table top, functional, and full scale, plus one extra of their choice, and complete them every four years.  This year’s exercise was a table top, hosted and held at the Harvest Land Verona Ag Center.

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Several departments were in attendance, including the Verona Fire Department, Lewisburg Fire & EMS, Clay Township Police Department, Preble County Sheriff’s Office and the Preble County EMA. Evaluators of the exercise included members of Gratis Fire Department and West Alexandria Fire Department, as well as retired assistant Fire Chief of Greenville, Dave McDermit.

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This training is beneficial for all fire departments and other emergency personnel because they learn how to work with everyone to prepare for practice runs.  It is also beneficial to the public because the training received will help them in the future, knowing that the rescue services have been properly trained.

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The table top exercise gives the departments a chance to reflect on how the mock scenario happened, and allows them to change any flaws that may have occurred, instead of in a real life case.

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Dave Anderson, the Preble County Emergency Management person, wanted to thank Harvest Land and their employees for hosting this event and being part of the planning team, plus all the participants for taking an evening of their time to practice this important piece of training.

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Thank you to our Harvest Land Central Ohio Ag  department for hosting this important event. You all keep safety a priority, even during the busiest of seasons.

 

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2018 Scholarship Recipients Announced

Harvest Land Co-op recently awarded 17 scholarships to 2018 high school graduates throughout their trade area, with combined money awarded totaling $17,000.

Harvest Land is a proud supporter of agriculture and young farmer programs,  such as 4-H and FFA, throughout the area. In addition to those opportunities, Harvest Land awards scholarships to young men or women who are pursuing post-high school agricultural degrees. Students from Harvest Land’s three districts within their trade market are chosen annually. Harvest Land also recognizes employees’ children who are graduating and pursuing post-high school education.

The 2018 winners are:

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Recipients of this award are chosen based on need, leadership, community service, agricultural interest and scholastics.

It is easy to turn on the news and feel deflated or pessimistic about the future of our great country. But if you want to turn your perspective around, just read through a few of these students’ scholarship applications and your insight will change. These young people are destined to go on and do great things because they have the work ethic, determination, skill set and discipline to do so.

We very much look forward to tracking their progress in the years ahead, and wish them the absolute best as they begin this next exciting chapter.

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Photo Friday: Early Season Snapshots

Before remnants of Hurricane Alberto moved through our area earlier this week (some growers got an inch of rain, others only received sprinkles) we got out in the field and snapped a few shots of our agronomy team going about their early season work. Fields are planted, but now we think about early season fungicide application.

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Don’t forget!

Fungi Event Web

 

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Harvest Land = Honest Ag

We don’t know the last time we saw men shake hands in a farm field, and we can guarantee there was no photographer there to capture the moment in perfect sunlight.

We can recall, however, the early mornings, long days and late nights we’re working with you to get seed in the ground, crop protection in the right place and applied at the right time. We’ve been running on all cylinders right there with you this spring.

This Friday, we simply want to share our latest video with you, reminding you that we’re not here to blow sunshine up your silo, we’re here to do what’s best for your operation.

Contact your local YieldPro Specialist for all your agronomy needs this season.

 

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Mothers: The Original Nurses & Teachers

There are three big days in May to celebrate people we know well:

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. It features a host of events across the U.S. to honor nurses for the work they do, and educates the public about nurses’ role in health care.

National Teacher Appreciation Day is May 8. Most desks at the head of the class are filled on this day with homebaked goods, gift cards, mugs and hand made cards. Gone are the days of the apple, but now are the days of the “I don’t know how you do it” notes from  mothers of 20+ students.

But most importantly, Mother’s Day will be celebrated on the second Sunday in May, and has been since 1914.

How fitting, we think, that we’re celebrating nurses, teachers and mothers all within days of one another. Without nurses, teachers or mothers, where would we be today? Well, probably sick, dumb and hungry.

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We think that Mothers are The Original Nurse:

When our early steps were wobbly, the world was inconceivably big and every wake up brought a new adventure or danger, we found Mom.

When the barn cat scratched, the dog ran us over or the bike hit the gravel just a little too hard and fast, we found Mom.

When we played rougher than we should have, climbed up too far only to come tumbling down, or felt something pop, snap or break, we found Mom.

When we were certain the first heart break was going to kill us dead and the pain was too much to handle, we found Mom.

When the yearning to go home in our first semester of college nearly did us in, disappointment saturated our soul or stress nearly sent us over the edge, we found Mom.

Because Mom has always known just what to do or say to heal all wounds.

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We think that Mothers are also The Original Teacher:

When Mom said, “You’re going to eat it and you’re going to like it,” she taught us that she apparently knows us better than we know ourselves.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get along with your brother or you’re both grounded,” she taught us how to make wise choices.

When Mom said, “Remember, as far as anybody knows, we’re a nice, normal family,” she taught us the value of self presentation.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get those 4-H project books completed today if it kills you!!” she taught us the value of competing a task.

When Mom said, “Because I’m you’re mother, that’s why,” she taught us not to question logic.

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When Mom stuck up for us when no one else would, forgave us when we didn’t deserve it, taught us well so we could go on without her, hugged us when she didn’t even want to look at us, held our hands through the lowest lows, and celebrated our highest highs, she taught us the value of Mothers. 

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Stop by our Greenfield Store today or tomorrow to find the perfect gift to thank Mom for all she has done, does and will do for you. 

 

 

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Hancock County Ag Safety Day

Our story of Cultivating Communities across our trade territory continues, as we attended the Hancock County Ag Safety Day on April 14, which was hosted by Hancock County 4-H.

The children rotated through several stations hosted by various community groups, such at Nine Star Connect, Canine Castaways Rescue, Greenfield Fire Territory and more. Harvest Land employee Vickie Ramsey was instrumental in organizing the day.
The Harvest Land station educated sixty 4-H members about grain safety. Specific topics included grain entrapment as well as auger and PTO hazards.

Today’s Photo Friday includes a few shots from our work with the youth of Hancock County.

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Thank you, Julie Lamberson, Risk Manager, for spending the day with these students.

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These two young men belong to Tarra Youngclaus from our Junction location.

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Many thanks to The Photography Barn for snapping these photos of our work.

 

 

 

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$10,000 Investment in Henry County

US 40, Interstate 70, State Roads 38 and 234 and US 36 are each main roads, east to west, in rural Henry County, Indiana. The county is then divided right down the middle by State Road 3. But once you’re off the beaten, paved paths of these main routes, you’ll find narrow roads where our trucks and equipment travel to and from our Mt. Summit, Millville and Dunreith locations to meet the needs of area farmers and home heat customers.

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Harvest Land and Henry County have a strong, long-standing relationship. We made a move this week to ensure that well-working relationship continues.

Harvest Land partnered with CHS to contribute $10,000 towards the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center. 

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L – R: Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO; Ron Huffman, Chairman, Henry County Local Emergency Planning Committee; Julie Lamberson, Harvest Land Risk Manager; and Brian Becker, Harvest Land Director and Henry County resident.

According to Purdue University research, in the last fifty years more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported, with a fatality rate of 62 percent. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfments − the highest number on record. The overall trend of increased on-farm grain storage only allows for more grain entrapments to happen around the family farm.

Every year accidents occur and responders are dispatched to assist, but most local responders arrive on scene with little to no training in the tactics or tools needed. The
intent of the grain entrapment addition to the Henry County Emergency Training Center is soybeanto add an option that addresses this issue. The completed grain portion of the center will provide responders and the ag community – including FFA members – a place to experience firsthand the dangers associated with entering into corn and soybeans. This training tool allows them to get a feel for both within minutes of each other, re-enforcing the differences in both commodities.

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A top down view of the proposed Grain Safety Training Area

At this time we know of no other facility that provides a place to practice real-world tactics
needed to rescue someone in trouble in both environments side by side. The layout of this
grain entrapment addition will also allow many viewers to see exactly what is taking place without need to share a viewport. It will truly be the first of its kind.

Perhaps most important: The Henry County Emergency Services Training Center is available to all those that wish to schedule its use for career, volunteer and agricultural trainings. Harvest Land is also going to use this facility to train employees and farmer-members, including students.

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We’re excited about this contribution to the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center and truly look forward to bringing dozens of employees, customers and students to this incredibly valuable site.

Together, we’re Cultivating Communities.

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Section 199A Update

Earlier in the year we shared with you the tax changes that accompanied Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, and, in particular, the new 199A deduction for farmer cooperatives and our members. Just weeks ago, lawmakers and tax experts introduced a “fix” to the unintended consequences included in the Section 199A provision of the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act. The proposal, which was signed into law by President Trump and will be retroactive to the start of the 2018 tax year on January 1, is intended to maintain tax relief for farmers as originally envisioned, while restoring to the greatest extent possible the competitive balance in the marketplace for cooperatives and non-cooperative ag businesses.

The National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, of which Harvest Land is a member, has issued an update and we’d like to share that with our farmer-members. Below, a list of frequently asked questions and answers:

Q: What is Section 199A?

A: Section 199A is a tax deduction that was included in the tax reform bill enacted in late December. Due to concerns that the provision would cause market disruptions, Section 199A has been amended with respect to transactions with cooperatives. The changes are retroactive to January 1.

Q: What does Section 199A do?

A: Section 199A has two purposes:

1. It provides a 20% tax deduction for all forms of businesses except C corporations. Because (most) C corporations received a 40% rate cut – from a top rate of 35% to a top rate of 21%, Congress recognized that other forms of business should receive tax relief. The 199A deduction applies to sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations, LLCs, etc.

2. It provides a replacement for prior-law Section 199 for cooperatives and their members.

Q: How does Section 199A apply to farmer cooperatives?

A: The calculation is the same as it was under prior-law Section 199 – it is 9% of the co-op’s qualified production activities income (QPAI). The deduction is limited to 50% of the co-op’s wages for the year that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts and may not exceed the co-op’s taxable income for the year. The co-op may choose to keep all or part of the deduction at the co-op level to offset tax liabilities; the remainder may be passed through to members.

 

Q:  How does the Section 199A deduction work for members of farmer cooperatives?

A: Farmers who transact with a cooperative on a patronage basis will calculate their 20% deduction on income from business conducted with the co-op, and will then perform the following calculation: Reduce the 20% deduction by the lesser of

(1) 9% of qualified production activities income allocable to such sales, or

(2) 50% of wages allocable to such sales.

A farmer’s Section 199A deduction will then equal the Section 199A deduction passed through to him or her by the cooperative plus the modi ed 20% deduction.

Q: Why is there a modification for farmers who do business with the cooperative?

A: The goal of Section 199A is to replicate prior-law section 199. Under “old” 199, the farmer would forego calculating his own 199 based on his on-farm wages, in exchange for using the co-op’s calculation and the possibility that the co-op would pass through its deduction. The reduction duplicates that dynamic in order to maintain the competitive balance that existed before tax reform.

Q: Could a farmer receive less than a 20% deduction when transacting with a cooperative?

A: Yes, if the cooperative has a low wage base relative to that of the patron or if the cooperative chooses to retain the deduction, the farmer’s total deduction may be less than 20%. Again, this reflects the dynamic in effect under old law Section 199.

Q: Could a co-op member receive a deduction in excess of 20%?

A: Yes, depending on how much deduction the cooperative passes through to its members. For example, a farmer with no wages (and joint taxable income less than $315,000) will receive a full 20% deduction on net income from sales to the cooperative, plus whatever deduction is passed through from the cooperative.

Q: Does the definition of “qualified business income” include crop payments (Per-Unit Retains Paid in Money).

A: Yes. PURPIMs were included under prior-law Section 199 and the IRS issued dozens of letter rulings af rming that treatment. The relevant language in Section 199A is identical to Section 199 and the Technical Explanation makes clear that any new regulations should be based on the Section 199 regulations.

Q: How is the provision of supplies treated under Section 199A?

A: The new law incorporates Section 199 Treasury regulations regarding supplies – namely, the definition of “agricultural or horticultural products” eligible for the deduction includes fertilizer, diesel fuel, and other supplies and products with respect to which the cooperative performs storage, handling, or other activities (see Reg. Sections 1.199-3(e)(1) and 1.199-6(f)).

Q: What if a farmer delivers product to a cooperative, but is not entitled to share in patronage dividends and is not otherwise entitled to participate on a patronage basis?

A: The farmer will receive the 20% deduction under Section 199A, but will not apply the reduction outlined above and will not be eligible for a pass-through deduction from the cooperative.

Q: What if a farmer’s operation is a C corporation?

A: C corporations are not eligible for any deduction under Section 199A. Lawmakers wanted to ensure that C corporations receive only the new, lower corporate rate, and not the additional 199A deduction. We are aware that some C corporation farms were taxed at 18% under prior law and are now taxed at 21%. Click here for a checklist for producers considering ownership restructuring in light of this restriction.

Q: What about Section 199 deductions generated in tax years beginning before the enactment of Section 199A?

A: A transition rule provides that Section 199 deductions attributable to taxable years beginning before January 1, 2018, may be utilized by taxpayers. The Technical Explanation specifies:

The proposal clarifies that the repeal of section 199 for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, does not apply to a qualified payment received by a patron from a specified agricultural or horticultural cooperative in a taxable year beginning after December 31, 2017, to the extent such qualified payment is attributable to qualified production activities income with respect to which a deduction is allowable to the cooperative under former section 199 for a taxable year of the cooperative beginning before January 1, 2018.

For more information on Section 199A, we suggest you consult your CPA or tax advisor for advice on your particular tax situation. In addition, the Joint Committee on Taxation issued a Technical Explanation of the bill and included over twenty pages on Section 199A.

All information provided as a resource from Land O’Lakes and the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives. You may print this full FAQ document here.

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