Harvest Land = Honest Ag

We don’t know the last time we saw men shake hands in a farm field, and we can guarantee there was no photographer there to capture the moment in perfect sunlight.

We can recall, however, the early mornings, long days and late nights we’re working with you to get seed in the ground, crop protection in the right place and applied at the right time. We’ve been running on all cylinders right there with you this spring.

This Friday, we simply want to share our latest video with you, reminding you that we’re not here to blow sunshine up your silo, we’re here to do what’s best for your operation.

Contact your local YieldPro Specialist for all your agronomy needs this season.

 

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Mothers: The Original Nurses & Teachers

There are three big days in May to celebrate people we know well:

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. It features a host of events across the U.S. to honor nurses for the work they do, and educates the public about nurses’ role in health care.

National Teacher Appreciation Day is May 8. Most desks at the head of the class are filled on this day with homebaked goods, gift cards, mugs and hand made cards. Gone are the days of the apple, but now are the days of the “I don’t know how you do it” notes from  mothers of 20+ students.

But most importantly, Mother’s Day will be celebrated on the second Sunday in May, and has been since 1914.

How fitting, we think, that we’re celebrating nurses, teachers and mothers all within days of one another. Without nurses, teachers or mothers, where would we be today? Well, probably sick, dumb and hungry.

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We think that Mothers are The Original Nurse:

When our early steps were wobbly, the world was inconceivably big and every wake up brought a new adventure or danger, we found Mom.

When the barn cat scratched, the dog ran us over or the bike hit the gravel just a little too hard and fast, we found Mom.

When we played rougher than we should have, climbed up too far only to come tumbling down, or felt something pop, snap or break, we found Mom.

When we were certain the first heart break was going to kill us dead and the pain was too much to handle, we found Mom.

When the yearning to go home in our first semester of college nearly did us in, disappointment saturated our soul or stress nearly sent us over the edge, we found Mom.

Because Mom has always known just what to do or say to heal all wounds.

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We think that Mothers are also The Original Teacher:

When Mom said, “You’re going to eat it and you’re going to like it,” she taught us that she apparently knows us better than we know ourselves.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get along with your brother or you’re both grounded,” she taught us how to make wise choices.

When Mom said, “Remember, as far as anybody knows, we’re a nice, normal family,” she taught us the value of self presentation.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get those 4-H project books completed today if it kills you!!” she taught us the value of competing a task.

When Mom said, “Because I’m you’re mother, that’s why,” she taught us not to question logic.

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When Mom stuck up for us when no one else would, forgave us when we didn’t deserve it, taught us well so we could go on without her, hugged us when she didn’t even want to look at us, held our hands through the lowest lows, and celebrated our highest highs, she taught us the value of Mothers. 

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Stop by our Greenfield Store today or tomorrow to find the perfect gift to thank Mom for all she has done, does and will do for you. 

 

 

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Hancock County Ag Safety Day

Our story of Cultivating Communities across our trade territory continues, as we attended the Hancock County Ag Safety Day on April 14, which was hosted by Hancock County 4-H.

The children rotated through several stations hosted by various community groups, such at Nine Star Connect, Canine Castaways Rescue, Greenfield Fire Territory and more. Harvest Land employee Vickie Ramsey was instrumental in organizing the day.
The Harvest Land station educated sixty 4-H members about grain safety. Specific topics included grain entrapment as well as auger and PTO hazards.

Today’s Photo Friday includes a few shots from our work with the youth of Hancock County.

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Thank you, Julie Lamberson, Risk Manager, for spending the day with these students.

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These two young men belong to Tarra Youngclaus from our Junction location.

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Many thanks to The Photography Barn for snapping these photos of our work.

 

 

 

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$10,000 Investment in Henry County

US 40, Interstate 70, State Roads 38 and 234 and US 36 are each main roads, east to west, in rural Henry County, Indiana. The county is then divided right down the middle by State Road 3. But once you’re off the beaten, paved paths of these main routes, you’ll find narrow roads where our trucks and equipment travel to and from our Mt. Summit, Millville and Dunreith locations to meet the needs of area farmers and home heat customers.

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Harvest Land and Henry County have a strong, long-standing relationship. We made a move this week to ensure that well-working relationship continues.

Harvest Land partnered with CHS to contribute $10,000 towards the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center. 

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L – R: Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO; Ron Huffman, Chairman, Henry County Local Emergency Planning Committee; Julie Lamberson, Harvest Land Risk Manager; and Brian Becker, Harvest Land Director and Henry County resident.

According to Purdue University research, in the last fifty years more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported, with a fatality rate of 62 percent. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfments − the highest number on record. The overall trend of increased on-farm grain storage only allows for more grain entrapments to happen around the family farm.

Every year accidents occur and responders are dispatched to assist, but most local responders arrive on scene with little to no training in the tactics or tools needed. The
intent of the grain entrapment addition to the Henry County Emergency Training Center is soybeanto add an option that addresses this issue. The completed grain portion of the center will provide responders and the ag community – including FFA members – a place to experience firsthand the dangers associated with entering into corn and soybeans. This training tool allows them to get a feel for both within minutes of each other, re-enforcing the differences in both commodities.

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A top down view of the proposed Grain Safety Training Area

At this time we know of no other facility that provides a place to practice real-world tactics
needed to rescue someone in trouble in both environments side by side. The layout of this
grain entrapment addition will also allow many viewers to see exactly what is taking place without need to share a viewport. It will truly be the first of its kind.

Perhaps most important: The Henry County Emergency Services Training Center is available to all those that wish to schedule its use for career, volunteer and agricultural trainings. Harvest Land is also going to use this facility to train employees and farmer-members, including students.

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We’re excited about this contribution to the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center and truly look forward to bringing dozens of employees, customers and students to this incredibly valuable site.

Together, we’re Cultivating Communities.

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Section 199A Update

Earlier in the year we shared with you the tax changes that accompanied Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, and, in particular, the new 199A deduction for farmer cooperatives and our members. Just weeks ago, lawmakers and tax experts introduced a “fix” to the unintended consequences included in the Section 199A provision of the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act. The proposal, which was signed into law by President Trump and will be retroactive to the start of the 2018 tax year on January 1, is intended to maintain tax relief for farmers as originally envisioned, while restoring to the greatest extent possible the competitive balance in the marketplace for cooperatives and non-cooperative ag businesses.

The National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, of which Harvest Land is a member, has issued an update and we’d like to share that with our farmer-members. Below, a list of frequently asked questions and answers:

Q: What is Section 199A?

A: Section 199A is a tax deduction that was included in the tax reform bill enacted in late December. Due to concerns that the provision would cause market disruptions, Section 199A has been amended with respect to transactions with cooperatives. The changes are retroactive to January 1.

Q: What does Section 199A do?

A: Section 199A has two purposes:

1. It provides a 20% tax deduction for all forms of businesses except C corporations. Because (most) C corporations received a 40% rate cut – from a top rate of 35% to a top rate of 21%, Congress recognized that other forms of business should receive tax relief. The 199A deduction applies to sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations, LLCs, etc.

2. It provides a replacement for prior-law Section 199 for cooperatives and their members.

Q: How does Section 199A apply to farmer cooperatives?

A: The calculation is the same as it was under prior-law Section 199 – it is 9% of the co-op’s qualified production activities income (QPAI). The deduction is limited to 50% of the co-op’s wages for the year that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts and may not exceed the co-op’s taxable income for the year. The co-op may choose to keep all or part of the deduction at the co-op level to offset tax liabilities; the remainder may be passed through to members.

 

Q:  How does the Section 199A deduction work for members of farmer cooperatives?

A: Farmers who transact with a cooperative on a patronage basis will calculate their 20% deduction on income from business conducted with the co-op, and will then perform the following calculation: Reduce the 20% deduction by the lesser of

(1) 9% of qualified production activities income allocable to such sales, or

(2) 50% of wages allocable to such sales.

A farmer’s Section 199A deduction will then equal the Section 199A deduction passed through to him or her by the cooperative plus the modi ed 20% deduction.

Q: Why is there a modification for farmers who do business with the cooperative?

A: The goal of Section 199A is to replicate prior-law section 199. Under “old” 199, the farmer would forego calculating his own 199 based on his on-farm wages, in exchange for using the co-op’s calculation and the possibility that the co-op would pass through its deduction. The reduction duplicates that dynamic in order to maintain the competitive balance that existed before tax reform.

Q: Could a farmer receive less than a 20% deduction when transacting with a cooperative?

A: Yes, if the cooperative has a low wage base relative to that of the patron or if the cooperative chooses to retain the deduction, the farmer’s total deduction may be less than 20%. Again, this reflects the dynamic in effect under old law Section 199.

Q: Could a co-op member receive a deduction in excess of 20%?

A: Yes, depending on how much deduction the cooperative passes through to its members. For example, a farmer with no wages (and joint taxable income less than $315,000) will receive a full 20% deduction on net income from sales to the cooperative, plus whatever deduction is passed through from the cooperative.

Q: Does the definition of “qualified business income” include crop payments (Per-Unit Retains Paid in Money).

A: Yes. PURPIMs were included under prior-law Section 199 and the IRS issued dozens of letter rulings af rming that treatment. The relevant language in Section 199A is identical to Section 199 and the Technical Explanation makes clear that any new regulations should be based on the Section 199 regulations.

Q: How is the provision of supplies treated under Section 199A?

A: The new law incorporates Section 199 Treasury regulations regarding supplies – namely, the definition of “agricultural or horticultural products” eligible for the deduction includes fertilizer, diesel fuel, and other supplies and products with respect to which the cooperative performs storage, handling, or other activities (see Reg. Sections 1.199-3(e)(1) and 1.199-6(f)).

Q: What if a farmer delivers product to a cooperative, but is not entitled to share in patronage dividends and is not otherwise entitled to participate on a patronage basis?

A: The farmer will receive the 20% deduction under Section 199A, but will not apply the reduction outlined above and will not be eligible for a pass-through deduction from the cooperative.

Q: What if a farmer’s operation is a C corporation?

A: C corporations are not eligible for any deduction under Section 199A. Lawmakers wanted to ensure that C corporations receive only the new, lower corporate rate, and not the additional 199A deduction. We are aware that some C corporation farms were taxed at 18% under prior law and are now taxed at 21%. Click here for a checklist for producers considering ownership restructuring in light of this restriction.

Q: What about Section 199 deductions generated in tax years beginning before the enactment of Section 199A?

A: A transition rule provides that Section 199 deductions attributable to taxable years beginning before January 1, 2018, may be utilized by taxpayers. The Technical Explanation specifies:

The proposal clarifies that the repeal of section 199 for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, does not apply to a qualified payment received by a patron from a specified agricultural or horticultural cooperative in a taxable year beginning after December 31, 2017, to the extent such qualified payment is attributable to qualified production activities income with respect to which a deduction is allowable to the cooperative under former section 199 for a taxable year of the cooperative beginning before January 1, 2018.

For more information on Section 199A, we suggest you consult your CPA or tax advisor for advice on your particular tax situation. In addition, the Joint Committee on Taxation issued a Technical Explanation of the bill and included over twenty pages on Section 199A.

All information provided as a resource from Land O’Lakes and the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives. You may print this full FAQ document here.

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A Pre-Plant Poem

A Pre-Plant Poem
by Harvest Land

Spring days are getting longer as we start to break the soil

Traffic slows behind equipment driven by local men of toil.

With a warm snap moving through you can almost cut the anticipation

Every move we’re about to make is a result deliberate conversation.

From plant to harvest, and plant again, we’re in a series of decisions

Analyzing data, selecting hybrids and programs and considering provisions.

Sometimes we forget how much promise can be in one tiny seed

Part of our job at Harvest Land is ensuring they get what they need.

We’ve been thinking about this crop since walking through the last

When time passes in seasons of work you come to realize just how fast.

Going forward our days will be designed around the warm sunshine or the rain

When you live your hours according to weather you come to terms with gain or pain.

And so we move into another planting season with anticipation far and wide

In high hopes that good help, weather, supply and parts all live in a time that coincide.

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Photo Friday: Investment in Eldorado Area

The small (some might say tiny) towns that dot the country side within our trade territory are special to us. Their small-scale grid of streets that travel out past the town limits eventually become the rural routes where our homes sit.

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The diners, post offices and parts stores that keep the commerce going are staffed with folks invested in these Midwestern burgs. The volunteers that give up their nights and weekends to answer the call of duty when an emergency erupts are our family, friends and former classmates. These are a few of the reasons why Harvest Land works to cultivate communities when we see an area of need.

Ohio has been a focus point for us to cultivate as of late.

Harvest Land recently donated a grain rescue tube to the Eldorado, Ohio fire department. The department needed the equipment to perform grain rescue should the emergency arise. Central Ohio manager, Adam Culy, organized the donation and also recognized a need for rescue training with multiple Ohio fire departments.

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Pictured from the right: Carlos Ramos, Adam Culy of Harvest Land, Atley Landes, Travis Simmons, Tom Evans, Stephen Evans, Bentley Evans, Wayne Rogers

So, in mid-March 35 firemen from the Eldorado, New Madison, West Manchester and New Paris fire departments performed a joint grain entrapment training at our Eldorado Ag Center. This Photo Friday includes some shots from that event.

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Seven Harvest Land employees were present for the training: Bob Brunk of Pitsburg, Gary Davis of Harvest Land Transportation, Adam Culy of Central Ohio Ag, Luke Dull of Eldorado, John Ott of Eldorado and Julie Lamberson and Nikki Pyott of Risk Management.

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We are thankful that our rural communities have so many volunteer firemen with courage to serve. Harvest Land is committed to providing resources to help our local departments.

 

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Harvest Land’s Top 10 Tips for Growing High Yielding Corn

Sound management decisions go a long way to help farmers secure yields and return on investment when growing corn. At Harvest Land, we offer a full consultative approach in which our YieldPro team prescribes a field-by-field plan for each year. Through the experience of our trained salespeople and input from our expert agronomists we have come up with our top recommendations for growing high yielding corn in our trade area.

  1. Hybrid Selection

Select hybrids from more than one maturity group for risk management and to spread out the workload at planting and harvest time. Choose hybrids with consistently high-yield _DSC0537corn ratings, good standability, strong disease resistance, and a range of maturities. Our trained sales staff can also walk you through the Characterization Charts to show the data from WinField United  Answer Plots across the united states, and local plots, to help assist you in your hybrid selection.

  1. Seed Genetics

Plant hybrids that have shown good yield trial results, plus your tried-and-true hybrids. Seed genetics with built-in herbicide tolerance traits can significantly enhance control of a broad range of tough-to-manage grasses and broadleaf weeds. Diversify hybrid choices to spread risk with a range of maturities and insect and disease susceptibilities.

  1. Seed Treatments

Today’s seed treatments can protect against diseases, insect pests and nematodes to help _dsc0768get young corn plants off to a good start. The wide range of products available can be confusing. Your Harvest Land YieldPro Specialist can help you make good economic decisions focused on the pests you are most concerned with.

 

  1.  Season-long Weed Control

Starting clean with a solid burndown program and/or tillage is critical.  Aim to control weeds before they reach 4 inches in height. Larger weeds are more difficult to control and compete more tenaciously with corn seedlings for sunlight, soil, water and other nutrients. “Driver weeds” like tall waterhemp and marestail usually take a special program (higher cost) for adequate control.

  1. Fertility

Top yields can only be achieved with a solid nutrient management program.  Proper nitrogen fertilizer practices are critical for high-yielding corn. YieldPro has proven to be a YieldPro_4Cvery effective program to prescribe field-specific programs to achieve this goal.

  1. Planting

Consider geography, weather and individual field conditions, such as drainage, when deciding if it’s fit to plant. Recommended planting dates for corn tend to range from early April to early May. Spring weather can change quickly from cool and wet to dry and warm. Planting when the field is too heavy can cause uneven emergence and potential yield reduction due to poor stands and soil compaction issues later in the season.

  1. Seeding Rate

Follow your seed company’s recommendations because there are many variables, such as Agronomy_Looking at plant-2soil types, different hybrid maturity dates and yield potential on various soil types. Seeding rates are a decision best made field-by-field. The Characterization Charts your trained Harvest Land salesperson has access to, can help you decide the optimal seeding rate for your soil type and management style.

  1. Field Scouting

Spotting problems in the crop is imperative.  Check fields early and often for emerging weeds, diseases and insects to help guide treatment decisions and economic thresholds.  Season-long management of weed, disease and insect pests in corn will aid your goal for best return on investment at the end of the growing season. The YieldPro team has the solution for your scouting and diagnostic needs.

  1. Plant Health

dld-4751Fungicides are a valuable tool.  Planned fungicide use helps prevent disease pressure from negatively impacting yields especially in a no-till situation with higher residue or in fields that were planted to corn the year prior.  Every hybrid purchased through Harvest Land will have a response to fungicide rate which will prove valuable in accessing the need for an application. The other option is to “wait and see”, but timely field scouting is critical.

  1. Resistance Management

Use diversified management practices to manage resistance to herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. Select products from different classes of chemistries that attack multiple, effective sites of action. Refer to sources such as Herbicide Resistance Action Committee (HRAC), Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) and Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC).

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During this undesirable economic time, it is imperative every decision you make for your farm is thought through and driven to make you a positive ROI. Mother Nature cannot be totally predicted or controlled, but we can do all that we can to ensure our crop can perform to the best of its ability in all situation. High yielding corn can be achieved by taking pieces from this article and personalizing it to your fields. Our YieldPro team, trained sales staff, and expect agronomists can help you navigate these decisions and achieve your yield goals.

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Hidden Gem: Greenfield Store

If you travel down US 40,

to Greenfield, the heart of Hancock County, Indiana,

just south west of the town square where the courthouse sits,

you’ll find one of Harvest Land’s best kept secrets:

Our Greenfield Store.

Located at 230 W. Osage Street, the Greenfield Store has a boundless selection of home, garden and farm supplies, livestock must-haves and even unique gifts for anyone on your list. This week we want to give you a glimpse into everything (well, not everything…we didn’t have time to photograph the impressive feed selection, or the variety of mulches available for all your spring needs) available at our Greenfield Store.

See something you like? Harvest Land will get it to your local ag center for fast and convenient pick up!

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Premium grass seed, Handy (and tacky!) straw to keep the seed in place, lawn starter fertilizer, weed killers to rid your yard and garden of even the toughest ones and a large variety of garden fertilizers.

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And my personal favorite: Wilt Stop. This stuff basically brings your plants back to health when your thumb ins’t so green.

Calling all stock show parents and 4-Hers! The Greenfield Store has nylon halters and neck ropes, show sticks, pipes, adhesive, paint, curry combs, brushes, soaps and washes, sheep blankets, tags, and a huge selection of Sullivan Supplies and Weaver Leather Livestock products.

Of course, we wouldn’t leave out the family favorite. We have pet supplies, toys, dishes, feeders, medication, treatments, hygiene products and more.

Plus pigs’ ears and cow hooves – if they’re into that sort of thing.

 

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We thought about highlighting the horse supplies with the rest of the livestock stuff, but there are certain rules against grouping the two together.

Fence supplies, grooming supplies and washes, fly spray, nutrition, salt and mineral: The Greenfield Store is your one-stop shop for all things equine.

We’re proud to carry a full portfolio of CountryMark oils, greases and lubricants. Stop outside and fill up your tank at our fuel station while you’re here and treat your vehicle to premium CountryMark fuels.

The store carries Lindner United, VitaFerm, Tribute, Purina, Kalmbach and more products to ensure your livestock have what they need to get started, reproduce, grow and perform. Can’t find what you need? Tell Cathy and she’ll get it ordered for you.

(MADE IN THE USA) Corinthian Bells wind chimes, absolutely unique bird houses and feeders, shatterproof gazing balls and enough bird feed to fill a smorgasbord: We have it. Also, see the little red barn bird feeder, above? It is squirrel proof. You could make an afternoon of watching squirrels fail at robbing the roost.

Let’s talk about how awesome these Surreal birch planters are. They’re not real wood! You don’t have to cut down a tree to get this kind of style around your yard! These creative planters are a favorite and we hope you come check them out as you prepare for spring sprucing.

Further details, pricing and more supplies are available by calling the store at 317.462.5551. Again, you don’t have to step foot in the door to take advantage of all the Greenfield Store has to offer – we’ll get it to you!

Oh, and before you leave, it might be a good idea to run any upcoming birthdays through your head. You’re welcome.

230 W. Osage St. Greenfield, IN 46160
317.462.5551
M-F 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 7:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Closed Sunday

 

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Finding Balance in the 2%

On Tuesday night Harvest Land was a sponsor of the 2018 Wayne County Rural Urban Banquet. This is a treasured tradition in the area, where people who dwell within the city limits share a meal and fellowship with those who make a living out on a country mile. For decades this event has brought farmers, business owners, elected officials and rural route residents to the table. It is a very popular event in east central Indiana.

This year was special in that the keynote speaker was Zippy Duvall, President of HPraerNi_400x400the National Farm Bureau Federation. Zippy is a third-generation farmer from Georgia. In addition to a 400-head beef cow herd for which he grows his own hay, Duvall and his wife, Bonnie, also grow more than 750,000 broilers per year. Have you ever eaten at Chick-fil-A? Chances are you enjoyed one of his birds.
Zippy delivered a fantastic address regarding the current state of government affairs in Washington and the issues on the table that will matter in agriculture, and in turn affect the food on tables in homes and restaurants. Though a large majority of the evening crowd may feel a disconnection to agriculture, the truth is that it affects nearly every aspect of their life, including food, clothing, energy and more.

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Many are familiar with the fact that only 2% of Americans farm today. Decades ago nearly every American family tended a garden because they had to; they depended on it year-around for fresh and canned produce. Today, most who have a garden do so because they enjoy the work and art of growing food for their family to enjoy. Gardens are no longer mandatory for feeding a family (much like 20 hens, a dairy cow, a beef steer, a hog, etc. also were) because the two-percent grow enough for food the rest of us.

The 2% of Americans farm, which gives 98% of Americans the freedom to do other things.

Other things, such as a chef who prepares a meal for new, exhausted parents who haven’t left the house in more than three weeks.

Other things, such as the 911 dispatcher who calmly answers the phone and talks to a terrified stranger on the other end of the line.

Other things, such as the child protective services employee who removes a child from an unimaginable home situation.

librarian with kids in libraryOther things, such as the librarian who encourages a child to put down an iPad and pick up a book, opening up a whole new world.

Other things, such as the generator installer who worked all night so a doctor’s office had restored power by the time the doors opened at 7:30 AM.

Other things, such as the fraud prevention officer at the bank who watches account information so that money within savings accounts stay there.

Other things, such as the fire fighter who runs into a burning building when everyone else is running out.

Other things, such as the loan officer who finds the way to loan a few bucks to a newlywed couple trying to buy their first home.

Other things, such as the tow truck driver who doesn’t sleep when snow falls, roads freeze or potholes get the best of another highway traveler.

2% of Americans farm, which gives 98% of Americans the freedom to do so many other, important things.

While 2% and 98% seem awfully off balance, if you consider the many admirable things others do outside of agriculture, you’ll realize that the work tends to balance. Harvest Land is grateful to be a part of events, such as the Rural Urban Banquet, that allow us to come together for an evening and remember that.

 

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