Perception: A Game Changer

Perception, as you well know, can change things.

What we see, what we hear, what we believe and how we act.
Perception is a game changer.

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While driving to church Sunday I was surprised to see a family emerge from a field and approach the roadway. I instantly hit my breaks, slowing down to try to process the situation. Did they need help?

It only took a few seconds to realize what was going on: This family was being followed out of the field by a gal with a camera and some props. They were having family photos taken on this Sunday morning. I drove by slowly as they waited for me to pass, and while doing so I scouted the field, which served as the scenic background.

I thought to myself: A weed patch? They chose the middle of a weed patch to get photos taken?

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To me, it looked like a poorly managed field that was over run by butterweed.

To this family and the photographer, it was a field full of beautiful yellow wildflowers, serving as a perfect, bright landscape for spring photos.

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Perception, as you well know, can change things.
What we see, what we hear, what we believe and how we act.
Perception is a game changer.

While we’re not in the business to make photographers work harder to scout the perfect field of “wildflowers”, we are in the business of finding solutions for local farmers to increase yield and profits. One of those ways is to implement a fall herbicide program that burns down weeds long before they even become a twinkle in a photographer’s eye.

Here are points worth remembering to ensure that weeds – such as the beautiful butterweed –don’t rob your yield.

  • All good weed control programs utilize a strong soil residual herbicide, followed by a timely post application when the weeds are still small.
  • Pests that winter in crop fields can make their home in annual winter weeds. Be proactive and use a fall herbicide to prevent the pests from over-staying their welcome during the cold winter months. Your wife’s weird uncle already does enough of that around Christmas! Pests such as black cutworm and soybean cyst nematode are easier to control in the fall by eliminating winter weeds.
  • Seedling corn does not compete well with early-season weed competition. Weeds that reach over 4 inches in height before they are sprayed silently rob yield.
  • Soils warm more quickly where fall herbicides are applied. In fact, studies show that soil temperatures increase by as much as 5 degrees in corn and 8 degrees in soybeans when a residual fall herbicide was applied. This allows for faster planting and fewer delays for customers who exercise a fall burndown program.
  • Maximize your time: Fall months usually provide more days that are suitable for field work. A burndown application applied post-harvest allows farmers to be certain that when the spring weather (finally) arrives they can efficiently use their time  planting the next crop.
  • All good weed control programs utilize a strong soil residual herbicide, followed by a timely post application when the weeds are still small.

I collaborated with agronomist Steve Dlugosz to write this week and he gave the family photo shoot story and the idea of perception a laugh. He remembers watching the music video of John Mellencamp’s Little Pink Houses on MTV and hearing the host remark about the beautiful, giant field of marigolds Mellencamp was dancing in.

Those weren’t marigolds; those were soybeans.

 

Ah, perception.

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