Fall Tips for Hard to Control Weeds

With several days of cool, dry weather, harvest is wrapping up at lightning speed. But the work isn’t over, yet.

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Let’s talk weeds.

Certain species of weeds are getting more aggressive – which means your crop protection plan needs to, also. Act now and knock out Marestail at seedling stage to prevent future issues. Fall burn down is efficient, effective and timely.

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When the crop comes off the field is the ideal time to take care of this predictable problem. Watch the video below to learn more about aggressive weed control from our agronomist Steve Dlugosz.

 

Contact your YieldPro Specialist today to get rolling on prevention.

 

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Photo Friday: Propane Safety in Hancock County

We do crop protection.

We do premium diesel fuel.

We do grain marketing.

We do soil sampling.

We do lubricants.

We also do education.

Four different  Hancock County fire departments recently practiced fire fighting techniques that could be used in residential or propane transport leaks or fires. Harvest Land applauds the efforts of these departments for being prepared for any emergency.  Propane for the training was donated by Harvest Land.

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Twelve days ago we were experiencing a summer that didn’t want to go to bed and 80 degree temperatures. Today, fall temperatures have moved in and propane is in demand as folks begin to heat their homes for the cold winter that lies ahead.

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Harvest Land  makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business. All propane employees attend a monthly safety meeting to receive education and refresher training on safety topics.

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Propane is a safe fuel source if precautions are taken and safety devices are in place. Harvest Land makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business.

Here is a quick refresher from our website on propane safety:

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We’re proud to supply propane to training events such as this, if it means that safety awaits on the opposite end.

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The Farmer

Today, October 12, is National Farmers Day. While we prefer to celebrate agriculture and the farmers who feed us daily (actually, three times a day – sometimes more if we need a snack), a single fall day in the middle of harvest is alright for celebrating them, too.

America’s farmers are the backbone of our economy and essential to global food security.

Today we share with you The Farmer, by Amelia Barr (1831-1919).

 

 

The Farmer

The king may rule o’er land and sea,

The lord may live right royally,

The soldier ride in pomp and pride,

The sailor roam o’er ocean wide;

But this or that, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The writer thinks, the poet sings,

The craftsmen fashion wondrous things,

The doctor heals, the lawyer pleads,

The miner follows the precious leads;

But this or that, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The merchant he may buy and sell,

The teacher do his duty well;

But men may toil through busy days,

Or men may stroll through pleasant ways;

From king to beggar, whate’er befall,

The farmer he must feed them all.

The farmer’s trade is one of worth;

He’s partner with the sky and earth,

He’s partner with the sun and rain,

And no man loses for his gain;

And men may rise, or men may fall,

But the farmer he must feed them all.

God bless the man who sows the wheat,

Who finds us milk and fruit and meat;

May his purse be heavy, his heart be light,

His cattle and corn and all go right;

God bless the seeds his hands let fall,

For the farmer he must feed us all.

 

 

Thank you, Farmers

 

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A Salute to the Unsung Harvest Heroes

Harvest is running on all cylinders across the United States. It’s easy for us to highlight the  tremendously important work the farmer does to harvest another crop to feed the general public, but what about those unsung heroes who work behind the scenes (or, wheel) to ensure harvest work goes as it should?

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Today we salute the harvest unsung heroes:

The unsung harvest heroes are the ones blowing out filters, checking oil and greasing every piece of equipment before the race gets started.

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The unsung harvest heroes spend time thinking up meals that can be eaten with one hand, transported effortlessly or used to feed the masses on the tailgate of a farm truck. They’re the ones who prepare meals with hurried love, deliver meals on time and don’t think about feeding themselves until 10:30 PM.

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The unsung harvest heroes take different route home from school every day so the future farmers can see where Grandpa or Dad are working.

The unsung harvest heroes are the fuel truck drivers who work tirelessly to fuel all of the combines, tractors, and semi trucks running the products up and down the road. They still answer their phone when a customer calls from the field at 9:00 PM, and takes off to deliver a load in the middle of a field so not to slow progress.

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The unsung harvest heroes act as a morning motivator when the future farmer presents his best argument for skipping school and riding in the combine all day.

The unsung harvest hero doesn’t understand what all the hype is over a pumpkin spiced latte. And until her town of 2,000 puts a Starbucks next to the parts store or grain elevator, she probably never will.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the ones hauling the grain to the elevator, spending their day wearing a path on the rural route roads, waiting in line, and eating their weight in co-op popcorn.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the people in charge of logistics, making sure that pick-up trucks get from field to field in order to get the farmers home each night if equipment is being left in the field over night.

The unsung harvest heroes are the ones driving the auger cart, positioning it perfectly for the effortless unload so the big wheels can keep on turning.

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The unsung harvest heroes are the “runners” who log 200 miles on their vehicle in a single October day and never leave the county.

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And finally, the unsung harvest heroes are the ones who spend a large amount of time traveling 15 mph with their flashers on, following equipment at night and ensuring everyone – and every piece of equipment – makes it home safely.
We salute you, harvest’s unsung heroes, for working the odd jobs that no one sees but everyone needs.
Keep trucking towards a safe and bountiful harvest 2018.
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