ACE Program Welcomes 2019 Hires

As our cooperative business evolves, Harvest Land recognizes the need to invest in our greatest asset: our employees. With nearly 1/3 of our employee group retiring in the next ten years, there is immense opportunity for individuals to advance their careers within our cooperative and gain extensive experience to provide greater service and value to our members.

As we prepare for the increased responsibilities and future demands of an evolving agriculture climate, we must provide emerging frontrunners with a broader perspective. This more-strategic perspective enables them to see the business as a whole—beyond specific functions or departments. By gaining this perspective, they are more prepared to successfully operate in leadership positions.

The ACE (Accelerated Career Excellence) program is a 12-month career development ACE Logo-01
program designed to enable participants to strategically frame their thinking, learn and use basic cooperative business knowledge and tools, and apply what is learned in the context of their accelerating career.

We recently welcomed two new ACE candidates to Harvest Land:

Kenzi Schwieterman, originally from Ridgeville, Indiana, joins us after graduating from Purdue with a Bachelor of Science in Agronomy. Before joining our team, Kenzi worked previously as a crops resource center teaching assistant at Purdue, a research diagnostic intern with the USDA and plays an active role on her family’s farm. Kenzi begins her career at Randolph Ag. 

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Nick Arnold is originally from Hagerstown and has launched his career with Harvest Land at Central Ohio Ag. Nick recently graduated from Purdue with a Bachelor of Science degree in agribusiness management. Prior to joining our team, Nick worked as a sales intern with AgriGold Hybrids and was also a Harvest Land Field Tech summer intern in 2017. Nick has also been a large part of operations on his family’s farm, where his passion for agriculture was ignited. 

Nick Arnold

We’re extremely excited about these two individuals joining the Harvest Land team and we look forward to the perspective they’ll bring to our farmer-owned cooperative.

Welcome, Kenzi & Nick!

 

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Maturities Do Matter

We’re getting many questions about making planting adjustments for corn and also soybean varieties in this delayed season. We sat down with agronomist Steve Dlugosz and Seed Manager Brandon Lovett to address concerns and talk about why maturities do matter right now.

Take a look –

 

 

As always, your YieldPro team at Harvest Land is here to discuss with you the best options for success in this difficult season.

 

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Sharpen The Axe: The Pan Test Process

It has been a challenging spring. Just as we think we’re entering the thick of busy season, moisture arrives and prevents us from getting anything done on local land.  

There is still plenty to do at our ag centers, whether we can get into a field, or not.

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Abraham Lincoln said,

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree

and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” 

The first four hours: That’s where we’ve been over the last two months, as a cooperative awaiting a change in season. So we’ve taken advantage of that time to do things like pan testing our machines so we’re prepared to run on all cylinders when we finally can. Pan testing, you ask?

Our Central Ohio Ag crew recently worked together to pan test machines for spring fieldwork. Pan testing is a process used to calibrate the spread pattern of a fertilizer applicator. Watch the video to see how the machines cross over the pans set at regular positions across the spread pattern, allowing us to evaluate how even the spread pattern is. We can then make adjustments to our machines to ensure our customers are getting the highest quality application every time.

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This is one more way we work to provide the best, most accurate service for our farmer-members. We wish you a safe planting season.

 

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Early Season Fungicide Success and Response to Sulfur

Increased pressure in diseased corn isn’t going away. Sara Nave from our Lena Ag Center, grower Richard Bodey and Agronomist Steve Dlugosz worked together in 2018 to develop and run a box trial that yielded really interesting – and telling – results regarding early season fungicide application and also response to sulfur. Bodey confirms that the treated side had greater plant stamina and standability.

So, how important is sulfur in the production of corn and soybeans? This week we invite you to watch the video below to find out!

 

Actual Trial Results:

Lena Trial 1

Lena Trial 2

 

Lena Trial 3

 

Your YieldPro Specialist is ready to visit with you about your options for the 2019 crop. Contact them today to get a plan in place for success this season!

 

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Building a Cathedral​

Harvest Land has an internal monthly newsletter called theLINK. TheLINK was created in 2014 in an effort to bridge the gap between our agronomy, energy, feed, and grain Company Newsletter May 2019_Page_1marketing businesses, highlight employees and share good news across our entire cooperative. The newsletter comes out on the last day of each month so that we’re able to kick off a new month with positive insight about our employer. Employees do a great job of sending in content to be used in theLINK so their co-workers can be recognized for a job well done.

In this monthly communication, our CEO writes a message to the entire employee base. Usually, he writes about an area where employees have contributed to the improvement of our cooperative in a special way or shares business insight that employees may not see otherwise.

 

We found this month’s Message from Scott

worth passing on to our Trust & Traction readers:

 

Have I ever told you the story of the three bricklayers?

A traveler came upon three men working. He asked the first man what he was doing.

The first man answered gruffly, ‘I’m laying bricks.’

The second man replied, ‘I’m putting up a wall.’

But the third man said enthusiastically and with pride, ‘I’m building a cathedral.’

They were all doing the same thing. The first man had a job. The second man had a career. The third man had a purpose.

There are countless positions held by our 300+ employees, and within a day, a single person can manage multiple tasks within their position. Every act that you contribute on our behalf matters. Whether you’re keeping organized records of fuel deliveries within the cab of your truck, paying our operational bills so that we keep the lights on, cleaning out the warehouse so we ensure critters are at a minimum or coordinating the delivery of a product to a farmer who is anxious about the season ahead: Your job at Harvest Land serves great purpose.

It is easy to get lost in the day-to-day immediate tasks. Those are the things that must be done now, or else. But let’s not lose sight of the value of the work. We may be laying bricks every day – come (excessive) rain, snow, or shine – but if we can envision the end result and go through our days with intention, our daily work becomes much more meaningful.

Today and always, I thank you for your work, brick by brick.

 

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This week we’ll leave you with this thought:

Are you viewing your day-to-day work as laying bricks or building a cathedral? If you make a daily effort to find value in even the smallest of tasks you’re taking on, your sense of purpose will become much greater. And living with purpose – if even in your 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM job – will offer you much more fulfillment than simply laying bricks.

We invite you to join our team in finding ways to value the work you do with a strong and stable vision of the end result.

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