Sharpen The Axe: The Pan Test Process

It has been a challenging spring. Just as we think we’re entering the thick of busy season, moisture arrives and prevents us from getting anything done on local land.  

There is still plenty to do at our ag centers, whether we can get into a field, or not.

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Abraham Lincoln said,

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree

and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” 

The first four hours: That’s where we’ve been over the last two months, as a cooperative awaiting a change in season. So we’ve taken advantage of that time to do things like pan testing our machines so we’re prepared to run on all cylinders when we finally can. Pan testing, you ask?

Our Central Ohio Ag crew recently worked together to pan test machines for spring fieldwork. Pan testing is a process used to calibrate the spread pattern of a fertilizer applicator. Watch the video to see how the machines cross over the pans set at regular positions across the spread pattern, allowing us to evaluate how even the spread pattern is. We can then make adjustments to our machines to ensure our customers are getting the highest quality application every time.

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This is one more way we work to provide the best, most accurate service for our farmer-members. We wish you a safe planting season.

 

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Early Season Fungicide Success and Response to Sulfur

Increased pressure in diseased corn isn’t going away. Sara Nave from our Lena Ag Center, grower Richard Bodey and Agronomist Steve Dlugosz worked together in 2018 to develop and run a box trial that yielded really interesting – and telling – results regarding early season fungicide application and also response to sulfur. Bodey confirms that the treated side had greater plant stamina and standability.

So, how important is sulfur in the production of corn and soybeans? This week we invite you to watch the video below to find out!

 

Actual Trial Results:

Lena Trial 1

Lena Trial 2

 

Lena Trial 3

 

Your YieldPro Specialist is ready to visit with you about your options for the 2019 crop. Contact them today to get a plan in place for success this season!

 

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Setting Priorities in a Compressed Season

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A challenging fall, which wasn’t ideal for applying a fall burn down, has set us up for an interesting spring ahead. Make sure you’re doing your tillage prior to making an application.

Simple Fact: You can’t stay clean if you don’t start clean.

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Watch as YieldPro Specialist Kyle Brooks visits with Glenn Longabaugh, Winfield United Regional Agronomist, regarding setting agronomic priorities in a compressed season. Glenn makes some excellent points about finding operational success this spring. 

Contact your YieldPro Specialist today to discuss

best practices for success in a season such as this. 

 

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Managing High-Yield Soybeans

A few weeks ago we sat down with grower Gary Lawyer to discuss the success he had in managing high-yield soybeans in 2018. Gary offered insight into why he believes  2018 was his best year, yet.

  • Applying fungicide and insecticide worked tremendously for Lawyer and his plan is to follow the same protocol in 2019.
  • Timing is important: An extra trip later in the season to manage disease can truly pay.
  • “Get better before you get bigger, and this is the easiest way I’ve found to do that.” – Gary Lawyer

Click below to watch Agronomist Steve Dlugosz and YieldPro Specialist David Vansickle discuss the keys to success grower Gary Lawyer used in 2018 to manage high-yield soybeans, and the things he will do again in 2019. 

 

 

To back up this insight, below are yield numbers from the area we’re discussing:

High Yield Beans 2018

Contact your YieldPro Specialist to develop your plan for better performance today. Also, if you want to begin receiving our agronomic emails, you can visit https://www.harvestlandcoop.com/Agronomy and sign up at the bottom of the page.

 

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2019 Forum Speaker Line-Up

FAKE NEWS.

We’re over it.

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That is why our Winter Innovation Forum brings in the nation’s best presenters to Wayne County, giving you only the facts on the industries that matter most for your business.

We thought today may be a great time to introduce you to the five individuals who will lead the discussions throughout the day on February 20.

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Terry Barr
Senior Director, Knowledge Exchange Division,
CoBank, ACB

Terry Barr, a nationally recognized economist, is senior director for CoBank’s Knowledge Exchange Division, an information-and-knowledge-sharing initiative created in 2009. The division draws upon the expertise and insights of experts inside CoBank as well as those of its customers and other third-party experts and professionals in the industries it serves.

Previously, Dr. Barr served as chief economist for the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives in Washington, DC from 1985 to 2009. Prior to joining NCFC, Terry held several positions during a 14-year tenure at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He served as chairman of the World Agricultural Outlook Board, which is responsible for coordinating USDA’s commodity forecasts and for publishing its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates. He also served in the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture as director of economic analysis. Terry holds a doctorate in economics from Washington State University.


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Chuck Conner
President and CEO, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives

Charles F. (Chuck) Conner became president & CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives (NCFC) on January 22, 2009. As president of NCFC, Conner will oversee the organization’s work to promote and protect the business and public policy interests of America’s farmer-owned cooperatives. He will also provide the strategic vision for the trade association as it continues to seek new ways in which to add value for its membership.

Prior to joining NCFC, Conner had served as the Deputy Secretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture since mid-2005. In this capacity, he was the Chief Operating Officer (COO) overseeing day-to-day operations of the department. Conner interacted directly with President George W. Bush and his senior staff to formulate domestic and international food, trade, security and energy policy. He led development of the Bush Administration’s $300 billion Farm Bill proposal and the strategy to educate and inform industry, constituents and Congress.

From August 2007 to January 2008, Conner served as both USDA Secretary and Deputy Secretary. He played a key role in developing the Administration’s immigration policy including important changes to the H2A program.

Conner’s experience also includes the assignment of Special Assistant to the President, Executive Office of the President, from October 2001 to May 2005, working on the 2001/2 Farm Bill to develop the strategy behind the transfer of several USDA agency functions to the newly formed Department of Homeland Security. From May 1997 to October 2001 Conner served as President of the Corn Refiners Association. He also served for 17 years as an advisor to U.S. Senator Richard Lugar of Indiana.

Conner is a graduate of Purdue University, with a Bachelor’s of Science degree and is the recipient of Purdue’s Distinguished Alumni Award. He and his wife Dru have four children.


Steve Dlugosz, CCA, Agronomist, Harvest Land Co-opDlugosz

Steve Dlugosz received a BS in Agronomy from Purdue University in 1980, and a MS in Entomology from Purdue University in 1991. He started his career as an Area IPM Extension specialist for Purdue, and worked an eleven county area of southwest Indiana. In 1985, he went to work for Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Inc. He has held various agronomic positions within the Cooperative system over the years of industry consolidation, and is currently the Lead Agronomist for Harvest Land Co-op.

Steve has been heavily involved in the CCA program since its inception, and has served in a number of leadership roles including Chairman of the International CCA Board in 2006. Steve has also served on a number of agricultural and industry boards and committees over the years. In 1997 he was appointed by the Governor of Indiana to serve on the Indiana Pesticide Review Board and currently serves today. He testified before two different Congressional Committees on Agriculture in 2005 and again in 2010


dysleTodd Dysle, UAN Products Manager, CHS

Todd Dysle has had a 31-year career in the Crop Nutrient industry, working for a retail/wholesale fertilizer distributor. He has spent more than 10 years with two international trading companies. Dysle joined CHS in 2008 as the Product Manager for UAN (Nitrogen Solutions) and has since handled all crop nutrients at one time or another. Today he manages the UAN and the Ammonia books

It with great fondness that Dysle shares his fertilizer business experience with you today. He has witnessed many industry changes over the years and very much enjoys sharing that information with farmers.

Todd Dysle was raised on an Ohio dairy farm where his passion for agriculture was ignited. He went on to serve as a State FFA Officer and then received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University. Dysle went on to be a Farm Broadcaster for 10 years and also a part time grain farmer.

Dysle has lived with his wife Paula in the Tampa, FL area the past 18 years. In his spare time he enjoys travel, golf, and his two granddaughters who reside in Ohio.


smith-charlie-091504Charlie Smith,
President/CEO
CountryMark

Charlie Smith is President and CEO of CountryMark Cooperative Holding Corp. (CountryMark). CountryMark’s operations encompass oil exploration and production, refining, and distribution-refined products to its branded retailers. Charlie began his career with the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) where he held a number of petroleum-related assignments in Houston, Anchorage and Dallas. In 1991, he joined a leading international petroleum consulting firm where he became Vice President and Director, managing the firm’s Mergers & Acquisitions practice. Charlie joined CountryMark in his current capacity in January 2003. Charlie holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Purdue University and is a graduate of the Hoosier Fellows program at Indiana University’s Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence. He also is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas. Charlie served eight years on the Advisory Board of the new Indiana State Department of Agriculture for which he received the Partner in Progress Award from Lt. Governor Becky Skillman. He currently serves on the Board of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, the Board of Advisors for Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business (Indianapolis), the Board of the Michigan Oil and Gas Association, and the Industry Advisory Council for Purdue University’s School of Chemical Engineering. Charlie recently received the 2015 Purdue University School of Chemical Engineering’s Outstanding Chemical Engineer Award.


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If you attend one meeting this winter, make it this one.
All the experts, in one place, on one day.
NO FAKE NEWS.

REGISTER NOW

Let’s Talk Seed.

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A few points to get the conversation started:

  • Seed Treatments – As commodity pricing has declined, in some cases growers have looked for ways to decrease input cost.  Seed Treatment has changed in some operations.  Seed treatment will not increase the germination of the “LOT”, however, it will increase the chances that each viable seed will become a “productive member of society”.
  • Populations: For many years we have overpopulated soybeans in Indiana and Ohio.  We have made a concerted effort to reduce planting populations over the last several years.  However, the 2019 year may not be the year to look at reducing plant populations.
  • Ownership – The best LOTs will be treated by Brands, best quality and highest Germ out the door first.  The only way to ensure the quality and Germ % of your soybeans is to OWN the product and have it on your floor. Harvest Land highly recommends that you take possession of product.
  • Replants are NEVER a good situation. – All above-mentioned situations will be included in FIRST plant units.  Many years we only really have one chance to do it Right.
Click below to watch Agronomist Steve Dlugosz and Seed Manager, Brandon Lovett, talk about seed treatment, populations, ownership and replant.

 

 

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Adjuvants: A Necessary​ Investment​

Our Shop Talks series has become popular because it provides candid conversation on real issues in the field, and provides timely insight on addressing them.

We’ve gotten a lot of questions about adjuvants and their value. This week, join R & F Ag Center Manager Tom Barfield and Agronomist Steve Dlugosz as they discuss the value of adjuvants.

  • Any herbicide label will have specific requirements for an adjuvant that is necessary for the herbicide to work properly.
  • It is important to remember that price is directly correlated with quality.
  • All adjuvants are not created equal.

Watch the video to learn more!

Your YieldPro Specialist is ready to talk. Contact them to learn more.

 

 

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3 Tips for Controlling Waterhemp

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ONE: Plan

Planned programs are the only way to control this weed – there is no longer an easy button!  Waterhemp isnt your average weed and has 1.5 times more seeds than other pigweed varieties and can grow one to two inches per day. Consider developing a program with your agronomist that is specific to your farm so you are prepared for when you first see the weed.

TWO: Identify

Waterhemp has been around for a number of years, coming in our area from the west, but unfortunately it’s not on growers’ radar until it’s on their farm for three or so years. Scout early and often, the key to controlling waterhemp is to make applications while it is still small. Waterhemp begins to grow as soon as the soil warms and the sun is out.

THREE: Attack

A combination of residuals (they stay in the soil) and post-emergence application are key. But don’t get too comfy after treating it once, waterhemp grows in flushes and it may take more than one application to control it.

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Click below to watch Agronomist Steve Dlugosz and YieldPro Specialist Mark Richey talk about waterhemp and what farmers can do to prevent the weed.

 

 

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Changing of the Guard

In the last couple weeks, a single Harvest Land ag center has had two life-long farm couples pull their wagons across the scales for the last time. No illness has caused this finality, no financial defeat impedes, they’re simply ready to enjoy this later chapter of life doing other things.

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It was an honor, that they would choose to come in for a photo during their last load. 

 

What a realization of seeing these farewell photos on social media brought; there is a true changing of the guard amongst families in agriculture. Those in their late sixties, early seventies are choosing to put the combine away one last time and not worry about the spring.

They’re selling what’s in the bin and renting the storage to someone else.

They’re cleaning up equipment so it can go on to the next steward.

They’re closing the books on a record year.

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But…

They’ll still wake before dawn and check the markets while the coffee brews.

They’ll still talk about the weather at every opportunity.

They’ll still stand in awe of new machinery at a farm show or neighbor’s shop.

They’ll still prefer the smell of freshly cut hay or the inside of the milking parlor to any cologne in a bottle.

They’ll still think the next generation doesn’t know how good they have it.

They’ll still worry about safety and say a silent prayer when they hear the local volunteer fire department race through the township on an October day.

They’ll still drive around in the spring and summer scouting crops.

They’ll still wear their Harvest Land hats and jackets they’ve acquired over the years, and they’ll regularly check the rain gauge we gave them during the soggy spring of 2017.

They’ll still subscribe to Farm World, Progressive Farmer and other publications that clutter the station beside the recliner so they’re still in the know.

They’ll still proudly call themselves a life-long farmer.

We have no doubt there are others out there calling the 2018 harvest their last as they enjoy retirement, perhaps they did not post farewell photos taken at the ag center to Facebook.

And we’ll miss them.

Their insight.

Their years of experience.

Their optimism gained from years gone by.

Their tired hands that have known the struggle.

Their passion for the work and the appreciation of the industry.

But we wish them the best, and we thank them for their years of business and partnership with Harvest Land Co-op. There is always a spot for you to visit with us at the ag center counter.

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