Photo Friday: 2019 Winter Innovation Forum

The rain, snow, and sleet didn’t stop growers from attending our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum. We had more than 400 in attendance from Indiana and Ohio and welcomed them each to a day of information, insight and conversation.

On this Photo Friday, we invite you to take a look at a few photos from the day.

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Many thanks to all who joined us!

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Winter Innovation Forum: February 20, 2019

We invite you to save the date for our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum, to be held at the Wayne County Fairgrounds on Wednesday, February 20, 2019.

This full-day event brings another round of powerhouse speakers to your backyard:

  • Terry Barr, CoBank: Global Grain Outlook: Global Demand and More
  • Chuck Conner, President/CEO at National Council of Farmer Cooperatives: Legislative Update from Washington, DC and How Today’s Politics and Policies Affect Your Farm
  • Steve Dlugosz, Agronomist at Harvest Land: Hard-to-Control weeds and Controlling Residuals, and More
  • Charlie Smith, President/CEO at CountryMark: What Global Energy Market Changes Mean for Your Business
  • Todd Dysle, CHS, Inc.: Global Fertilizer Outlook

These nationally known speakers will present multiple times throughout the day, allowing you to set your own schedule. This event is free to the public and you need not be a Harvest Land member to attend. Registration will open in January 2019.

Stay tuned for more details, industry partners who will be available to answer your questions and a full agenda.

What have previous attendees said about the Winter Innovation Forum?

“Excellent program! Kudos to those that planned the event. Speakers were informative, topics were spot on with agriculture in today’s world.”

“Comprehensive, well run, organized and relevant.”

“Very well done, enjoyed the day.”

“Excellent event!”

Mark your calendar today!

Farm to Table: Your Thanksgiving Plate

This time next week you’ll be wishing you owned more elastic waistband pants.

Thanksgiving is quickly approaching, so we thought it was a perfect time to educate eaters about the food on their heaping plate. Because, let’s face it: When you’re stuck at the table with the awkward uncle, you may need something to talk about.

We all know the star of the Thanksgiving Day show is the turkey.  Your turkey might have come from one of these top turkey-producing states: Minnesota, North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana and Missouri. We know a lot of farmers in our trade territory who have put up turkey barns in the last ten years.

Did you know this about the big birds?:

  • Turkey is low in fat, high in protein and is a good source of iron, zinc, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins
  • Cartoon turkeys you normally see are actually dark feathered or wild turkeys. Farmers typically raise a different breed of turkeys which are more efficient at producing meat. These turkeys have white feathers.
  • Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey as the official United States bird.  Dismayed by news of the selection of the bald eagle, Franklin replied, “The turkey is a much more respectable bird, and withal a true original of America.” It makes us wonder how our diets might be different had the turkey triumphed.

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Read more about turkey farming in our area.

  • Cranberries, along with blueberries and Concord grapes, are one of three cultivated fruits that are native to North America.
  • Some cranberry vines in Massachusetts are more than 150 years old.
  • Cranberries don’t actually grow in water, rather they grow on dry land and are harvested using water because cranberries float.
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Did you know Ocean Spray is also a farmer-owned cooperative?
  • Starting in October pumpkins start to make their way onto stoops, into coffee cups and onto plates. Pumpkin Spiced What-te?
  • Squash was part of the Three Sisters, a combination of corn, beans and squash that were planted together by Native Americans
  • The stalks of the corn supported the beans, the beans added nitrogen back to the soil and the squash spread across the ground blocking sunlight from weeds.

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  • Sweet potatoes are a staple on most Thanksgiving Day tables.
  • You may have heard “sweet potatoes” and “yams” used interchangeably, but they are actually from different botanical families.
  • Sweet potatoes come from the morning glory family and yams come from the lily family.

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  • The turkey isn’t the only animal at the table.
  • Most marshmallows contain gelatin, which is a protein substance derived from collagen, a natural protein present in the tendons, ligaments, and tissues of mammals.
  • Before you consider going vegan, remember how marshmallows make the sweet potato casserole.

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We wish your family a very Happy Thanksgiving

 

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Source: American Farm Bureau Federation

Photo Friday: Propane Safety in Hancock County

We do crop protection.

We do premium diesel fuel.

We do grain marketing.

We do soil sampling.

We do lubricants.

We also do education.

Four different  Hancock County fire departments recently practiced fire fighting techniques that could be used in residential or propane transport leaks or fires. Harvest Land applauds the efforts of these departments for being prepared for any emergency.  Propane for the training was donated by Harvest Land.

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Twelve days ago we were experiencing a summer that didn’t want to go to bed and 80 degree temperatures. Today, fall temperatures have moved in and propane is in demand as folks begin to heat their homes for the cold winter that lies ahead.

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Harvest Land  makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business. All propane employees attend a monthly safety meeting to receive education and refresher training on safety topics.

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Propane is a safe fuel source if precautions are taken and safety devices are in place. Harvest Land makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business.

Here is a quick refresher from our website on propane safety:

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We’re proud to supply propane to training events such as this, if it means that safety awaits on the opposite end.

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The Big Reveal: Fall Application

Harvest 2018 is rapidly approaching and it’s almost time to reveal the results of what we’ve been working toward all season long.

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The season is coming to an end, so now is the time to prepare for next years crop.  With great success comes great stress.  In high yielding fields, make sure you return those nutrients removed back to the soil.

Fall is the time to replace what was lost with a strong fertility plan by taking advantage weather and time restraints.  Not to mention less risk for compaction!

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Talk to your local ag center or YieldPro Specialist to get ahead this harvest season.

 

 

Meet Sarah Griffin, Animal Nutrition Specialist

Our Kalmbach Feeds of Indiana team recently welcomed Sarah Griffin onboard as an Animal Nutrition Specialist. Sarah’s day-to-day responsibilities as Animal Nutrition Specialist will include meeting with existing clients to ensure the continued satisfaction with our company products and also finding ways to expand our current customer base. She will also meet with new clients to provide their farm with quality nutrition for their livestock.

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Griffin Sarah-3Sarah has a Bachelor’s of Science in Animal Science from Purdue University, as well as a
Masters of Art in Communication Studies with a focus on Organizational and Professional Communication Development from Ball State University.

Sarah grew up on a diversified livestock farm where she raised livestock for 4-H and as a supervised agriculture experience and proficiency for FFA. Throughout her time in 4-H and FFA, she competed in many dairy and livestock judging events which cultivated a deeper understanding and passion for the animal agriculture industry.

During her time at Purdue, she competed on the Dairy Farm Evaluation team where she had the opportunity to travel the Midwest evaluating dairy farms on their nutrition,  management, facilities and herd health. This experience left a lasting impression on her and has been extremely helpful in starting her new role for Kalmbach Feeds of Indiana.

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As an Animal Nutrition Specialist, Sarah represents our company in a unique way. Since she will be consistently meeting with new and existing clients, she will be the face of the company every day. Additionally, she will do more than simply sell feed; she will work with each farmer to provide a nutrition program that suites their individual livestock operation, which includes feed consumed, evaluation of herd health, and management practices.

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Harvest Land is very happy to welcome Sarah to the Kalmbach Feeds of Indiana team. Her industry knowledge paired with excellent communication skills makes her a perfect fit within our business. Welcome, Sarah!

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Photo Friday: 2018 Fueling Freedom

A week ago today we participated in Fueling Freedom, where for every gallon of fuel purchased at our Elwood, Fountaintown, Greenfield, Greenville and Oxford stations last Friday from noon to 5:00 PM, CountryMark and Harvest Land donated 50 cents to local National Guard Family Readiness Groups. 

While Americans may support our troops in many ways, families waiting back home can often be overlooked. This program supports this less-recognized group and Harvest Land is glad to be a part of it. 

Every Harvest Land location increased their fuel gallons from 2017, with the exception of the KDS Express station in Oxford, only because they didn’t participate in 2017:

Elwood increased gallons by 2,567

Fountaintown increased gallons by 1,054

Greenfield increased gallons by 414

Greenville increased gallons by 131

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Today’s Photo Friday provides a look at the event, with photos from all over our territory:

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Thank you to everyone who stopped by and fueled up cars, semis, lawn mowers, gas cans and more! We appreciate the support very much.

 

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Mothers: The Original Nurses & Teachers

There are three big days in May to celebrate people we know well:

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. It features a host of events across the U.S. to honor nurses for the work they do, and educates the public about nurses’ role in health care.

National Teacher Appreciation Day is May 8. Most desks at the head of the class are filled on this day with homebaked goods, gift cards, mugs and hand made cards. Gone are the days of the apple, but now are the days of the “I don’t know how you do it” notes from  mothers of 20+ students.

But most importantly, Mother’s Day will be celebrated on the second Sunday in May, and has been since 1914.

How fitting, we think, that we’re celebrating nurses, teachers and mothers all within days of one another. Without nurses, teachers or mothers, where would we be today? Well, probably sick, dumb and hungry.

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We think that Mothers are The Original Nurse:

When our early steps were wobbly, the world was inconceivably big and every wake up brought a new adventure or danger, we found Mom.

When the barn cat scratched, the dog ran us over or the bike hit the gravel just a little too hard and fast, we found Mom.

When we played rougher than we should have, climbed up too far only to come tumbling down, or felt something pop, snap or break, we found Mom.

When we were certain the first heart break was going to kill us dead and the pain was too much to handle, we found Mom.

When the yearning to go home in our first semester of college nearly did us in, disappointment saturated our soul or stress nearly sent us over the edge, we found Mom.

Because Mom has always known just what to do or say to heal all wounds.

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We think that Mothers are also The Original Teacher:

When Mom said, “You’re going to eat it and you’re going to like it,” she taught us that she apparently knows us better than we know ourselves.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get along with your brother or you’re both grounded,” she taught us how to make wise choices.

When Mom said, “Remember, as far as anybody knows, we’re a nice, normal family,” she taught us the value of self presentation.

When Mom said, “You’re going to get those 4-H project books completed today if it kills you!!” she taught us the value of competing a task.

When Mom said, “Because I’m you’re mother, that’s why,” she taught us not to question logic.

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When Mom stuck up for us when no one else would, forgave us when we didn’t deserve it, taught us well so we could go on without her, hugged us when she didn’t even want to look at us, held our hands through the lowest lows, and celebrated our highest highs, she taught us the value of Mothers. 

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Stop by our Greenfield Store today or tomorrow to find the perfect gift to thank Mom for all she has done, does and will do for you. 

 

 

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Section 199A Update

Earlier in the year we shared with you the tax changes that accompanied Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, and, in particular, the new 199A deduction for farmer cooperatives and our members. Just weeks ago, lawmakers and tax experts introduced a “fix” to the unintended consequences included in the Section 199A provision of the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act. The proposal, which was signed into law by President Trump and will be retroactive to the start of the 2018 tax year on January 1, is intended to maintain tax relief for farmers as originally envisioned, while restoring to the greatest extent possible the competitive balance in the marketplace for cooperatives and non-cooperative ag businesses.

The National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, of which Harvest Land is a member, has issued an update and we’d like to share that with our farmer-members. Below, a list of frequently asked questions and answers:

Q: What is Section 199A?

A: Section 199A is a tax deduction that was included in the tax reform bill enacted in late December. Due to concerns that the provision would cause market disruptions, Section 199A has been amended with respect to transactions with cooperatives. The changes are retroactive to January 1.

Q: What does Section 199A do?

A: Section 199A has two purposes:

1. It provides a 20% tax deduction for all forms of businesses except C corporations. Because (most) C corporations received a 40% rate cut – from a top rate of 35% to a top rate of 21%, Congress recognized that other forms of business should receive tax relief. The 199A deduction applies to sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations, LLCs, etc.

2. It provides a replacement for prior-law Section 199 for cooperatives and their members.

Q: How does Section 199A apply to farmer cooperatives?

A: The calculation is the same as it was under prior-law Section 199 – it is 9% of the co-op’s qualified production activities income (QPAI). The deduction is limited to 50% of the co-op’s wages for the year that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts and may not exceed the co-op’s taxable income for the year. The co-op may choose to keep all or part of the deduction at the co-op level to offset tax liabilities; the remainder may be passed through to members.

 

Q:  How does the Section 199A deduction work for members of farmer cooperatives?

A: Farmers who transact with a cooperative on a patronage basis will calculate their 20% deduction on income from business conducted with the co-op, and will then perform the following calculation: Reduce the 20% deduction by the lesser of

(1) 9% of qualified production activities income allocable to such sales, or

(2) 50% of wages allocable to such sales.

A farmer’s Section 199A deduction will then equal the Section 199A deduction passed through to him or her by the cooperative plus the modi ed 20% deduction.

Q: Why is there a modification for farmers who do business with the cooperative?

A: The goal of Section 199A is to replicate prior-law section 199. Under “old” 199, the farmer would forego calculating his own 199 based on his on-farm wages, in exchange for using the co-op’s calculation and the possibility that the co-op would pass through its deduction. The reduction duplicates that dynamic in order to maintain the competitive balance that existed before tax reform.

Q: Could a farmer receive less than a 20% deduction when transacting with a cooperative?

A: Yes, if the cooperative has a low wage base relative to that of the patron or if the cooperative chooses to retain the deduction, the farmer’s total deduction may be less than 20%. Again, this reflects the dynamic in effect under old law Section 199.

Q: Could a co-op member receive a deduction in excess of 20%?

A: Yes, depending on how much deduction the cooperative passes through to its members. For example, a farmer with no wages (and joint taxable income less than $315,000) will receive a full 20% deduction on net income from sales to the cooperative, plus whatever deduction is passed through from the cooperative.

Q: Does the definition of “qualified business income” include crop payments (Per-Unit Retains Paid in Money).

A: Yes. PURPIMs were included under prior-law Section 199 and the IRS issued dozens of letter rulings af rming that treatment. The relevant language in Section 199A is identical to Section 199 and the Technical Explanation makes clear that any new regulations should be based on the Section 199 regulations.

Q: How is the provision of supplies treated under Section 199A?

A: The new law incorporates Section 199 Treasury regulations regarding supplies – namely, the definition of “agricultural or horticultural products” eligible for the deduction includes fertilizer, diesel fuel, and other supplies and products with respect to which the cooperative performs storage, handling, or other activities (see Reg. Sections 1.199-3(e)(1) and 1.199-6(f)).

Q: What if a farmer delivers product to a cooperative, but is not entitled to share in patronage dividends and is not otherwise entitled to participate on a patronage basis?

A: The farmer will receive the 20% deduction under Section 199A, but will not apply the reduction outlined above and will not be eligible for a pass-through deduction from the cooperative.

Q: What if a farmer’s operation is a C corporation?

A: C corporations are not eligible for any deduction under Section 199A. Lawmakers wanted to ensure that C corporations receive only the new, lower corporate rate, and not the additional 199A deduction. We are aware that some C corporation farms were taxed at 18% under prior law and are now taxed at 21%. Click here for a checklist for producers considering ownership restructuring in light of this restriction.

Q: What about Section 199 deductions generated in tax years beginning before the enactment of Section 199A?

A: A transition rule provides that Section 199 deductions attributable to taxable years beginning before January 1, 2018, may be utilized by taxpayers. The Technical Explanation specifies:

The proposal clarifies that the repeal of section 199 for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, does not apply to a qualified payment received by a patron from a specified agricultural or horticultural cooperative in a taxable year beginning after December 31, 2017, to the extent such qualified payment is attributable to qualified production activities income with respect to which a deduction is allowable to the cooperative under former section 199 for a taxable year of the cooperative beginning before January 1, 2018.

For more information on Section 199A, we suggest you consult your CPA or tax advisor for advice on your particular tax situation. In addition, the Joint Committee on Taxation issued a Technical Explanation of the bill and included over twenty pages on Section 199A.

All information provided as a resource from Land O’Lakes and the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives. You may print this full FAQ document here.

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If This Jacket Could Talk

We’re wrapping up National FFA Week, which is a week for chapters and members to share agriculture with their fellow students as well as their communities. Students in our area hosted breakfasts, spoke at conferences, held fundraisers and more. No doubt, the Official Dress and old FFA jacket will be ready for a break after school today.

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If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that it knows Robert – and his Rules of Order- very well.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that you might outgrow jacket itself, but you won’t outgrow the memories or experiences.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that Official Dress really does matter. No jeans, no dirty boots, no zippers undone:

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that many of your greatest lessons in high school happen after the 3:00 bell rings.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you your scarf or tie is hiding in your left pocket.

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If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that when we think of our favorite chapters, we don’t think of a book.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that FFA is one organization that has remained true to it’s core through generations. We all still believe in the future of agriculture, with a faith born not of words but of deeds – achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the better things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years.

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If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that corduroy has a special durability to withstand the harshest October wind streaming through Indianapolis during convention, pins and embroidery needles that come along with leadership changes and even constructive criticism from judges.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you to prepare yourself for the day that you hang up your jacket, placing it in the back corner of your closet, knowing it’s work is done, never to be worn again. It is a moment that signifies the end of a chapter in your life. But don’t you worry, the best is yet to come.

If this jacket could talk, it would tell you that FFA is more than future farmers of America, but rather future botanists, food scientists, veterinarians, ag journalists, loan officers, chemical salesmen, farm broadcasters, teachers, nutritionists, applicators, mechanics and so much  more.

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Thank you to the advisors who dedicate so much of their time and energy to the students of the FFA organization, to the students who comprise such a promising group of future agriculturalists and to the parents who buy an endless supply of black panty hose and clean white oxford shirts for four years to get those students through. The FFA is an organization that gives us such promise of better days.

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