Fall Herbicide: Part 1

We often get this question:
Does fall burndown replace a spring herbicide application?
  • Take care of winter annuals in the fall, when they’re at their most susceptible time in the life cycle. This eliminates residue in the field, allowing your fields to dry out quicker, getting you in the field sooner in spring 2021.
  • Do you know what pests lay eggs in winter annual foliage? These larvae go on to chew on emerging crop as it grows.
  • It is so important to kill driver weeds, such as marestail, in the fall while they’re in the rosette stage so you don’t have to double spray them to achieve control in the spring.

Watch as Mike Shrack, YieldPro Specialist, visits with Drake Copeland, FMC Technical Service Manager, about the agronomic and efficiency benefits of a fall burndown.

Why YieldPro Now?

YieldPro is so much more than a soil sampling service.
  • ​We believe in allocating scarce resources through the 4 Rs: 

Right fertilizer source at the
Right rate, at the
Right time and in the
Right place

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  • Properly managed fertilizers support cropping systems that provide economic, social and environmental benefits. On the other hand, poorly managed nutrient applications can decrease profitability and increase nutrient losses, potentially degrading water and air.

  • Yield data coupled with soil analysis pack a powerful punch when it comes to recommendations for your individual fields. 

Watch as Seth Lawyer, YieldPro Specialist, visits with Curt Naylor, YieldPro manager, about the reasons why the YieldPro program is valuable as ever. 

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Harvest Loss Considerations

Let’s Talk Harvest Loss and Prioritizing Harvest 2020

  • NOW is the time to prioritize fields and look for signs and symptomologies arising.
  • Physoderma has the ability to reduce stalk integrity – do you know how to identify it? Yellowing up the mid-rib often leads to crown rot – take a look at the symptoms in this short video.
  • A push test is an easy way to prioritize fields – don’t just harvest in the order you planted.

Here’s a question: What’s the economic threshold of what is coming out the back of your combine?

Take less than 8 minutes to learn more about prioritizing fields during Harvest 2020, harvest loss and strategies for harvest success in corn and soybeans. Glenn Longabaugh, Winfield United Regional Agronomist, and Mark Richey, YieldPro Specialist, visit more here:

Seed Considerations for 2021

SEED CONSIDERATIONS FOR 2021
  • The purpose of the Answer Plot is to help growers make sound choices by reviewing varieties and hybrids in-season. We encourage you to walk fields now to get a real-time view of issues and success. 
  • Harvest Land has yield competitive programs available through our Harvest Elite and Harvest Strong programs that provide proof through data…take a look at the numbers below!
  • Lastly, we invite you to look into our many financing options that are available to you. Don’t miss the window to maximize your investment. 
In under six minutes, you can learn about financing programs, getting to the field now to make valuable decisions and competitive programs that could land you on a beach. Watch as Brandon Lovett, Seed Manager, and Denver Norris, YieldPro Specialist, talk more:

 

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Co-Alliance and Harvest Land to Pursue Merger

Indiana-based agricultural cooperatives Co-Alliance, LLP and Harvest Land Cooperative announced on Thursday an agreement to pursue a merger.

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“This merger will offer exceptional opportunities to our farmer-owners in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and Illinois. The expanded resources, more robust product line and extension of quality service will extend beyond what the two co-ops could offer individually. Together, we anticipate great success in cultivating opportunities for our members through this historic merger with the Co-Alliance team,” said Scott Logue, CEO of Harvest Land.

The merger would bring efficiencies to the agronomy, energy, grain, swine, and animal nutrition services of each company and is representative of the importance of scale in the cooperative model serving local farmers. “The opportunity to merge with Harvest Land brings both companies a chance to enhance their customer experience and meet the growing demands of the ever-changing agriculture industry.  We are excited to bring this powerful combination to our grower members,” added Kevin Still, CEO of Co-Alliance.

Due diligence will begin in the coming months with hope to complete the merger in 2021.

Co-Alliance and Harvest Land are already partnered on United Agronomy Services, LLP, a full-service agronomy retailer in Summitville, Indiana. This location is consistently a top performer for both parent companies.

Harvest Land Co-op is a local, farmer-owned cooperative, providing innovative agronomic and energy services in east central Indiana and southwest Ohio. Originally organized in the late 1920’s, they continue to specialize in providing farmers with the products and strategic opportunities they need to operate effectively and profitably. Their business is focused around four key areas for their members: agronomy, energy, grain and feed. Harvest Land works diligently to reduce risk for the sole operator, whether that be through fuel or propane contracting, grain marketing insight, crop protection products or providing a balanced diet for livestock.

Co-Alliance LLP is a member-owned supply and marketing operation delivering innovative solutions for farmer-members and customers across Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois specializing in agronomy, propane, fuels, grain, seed, hog production and feed. The customer-focused company strives to fulfill its collective mission to lead with people and technology, grow profitably, give back locally, and remember it is a cooperative.

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Magnets in Grain Systems

All of Harvest Land’s grain locations have at least one magnet somewhere within the system. These magnets serve many purposes and they all include aspects of quality control. Harvest Land provides grain to locations such as Hills Pet Food and Provimi, who require us to have magnets to ensure the safety of their products for their consumers. 

Magnets also collect any pieces of metal (both large and small) that come through the grain dump. Trapping this metal before it runs through the whole system prevents things from being torn up from the sharp edges. It also prevents the pieces from entering the bins, where our employees could potentially hurt themselves during the bin clean out process.

These magnets are tested annually to make sure they pass the “pull test,” and are cleaned at least twice a year. 

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Magnet with clump of metal and dust.

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After scraping & cleaning off the magnet.

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After cleaning dust off hardware.

Harvest Land is committed to providing quality products to supply the food chain, whether that be for pets or humans, and magnets help us tremendously with such a mission.

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2019 Summer Harvest Supper

Last evening Harvest Land sponsored the meal at the 2019 Summer Harvest Supper at farmer-member Neil and LuAnn Gettinger’s home. The intent of this supper, organized by Wayne County Farm Bureau, was to invite consumers to share a meal with local producers and open the evening to conversation about food production.

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Each supper table was set for six consumers and two producers. The producers consisted of dairymen, beef, poultry and swine producers, grain farmers, large animal veterinarians, and fruit and vegetable growers.

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The consumers represented a large array of people, including business owners, teachers, insurance agents and more. The goal of the event was to have an open conversation about safe food production, and the evening proved that there is still a lot of questions out there!

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Harvest Land was represented well: Debi Hill, farmer-member, Vickie Ramsey, Richmond office, and Allison Chalfant, farmer-member

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Harvest Land believes strongly in educating the public about what we do. Our largest critics seem to be those who may misunderstand or are fearful based on misinformation. The Summer Harvest Supper is a perfect place to open that dialog and tell our story.

We’re proud to have been a part of this event for three years and we hope the consumers have found as much value in it as we have.

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CEO Scott Logue gives closing remarks regarding today’s agricultural climate and the importance of such an event.

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Photo Friday: 2019 Winter Innovation Forum

The rain, snow, and sleet didn’t stop growers from attending our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum. We had more than 400 in attendance from Indiana and Ohio and welcomed them each to a day of information, insight and conversation.

On this Photo Friday, we invite you to take a look at a few photos from the day.

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Many thanks to all who joined us!

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Winter Innovation Forum: February 20, 2019

We invite you to save the date for our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum, to be held at the Wayne County Fairgrounds on Wednesday, February 20, 2019.

This full-day event brings another round of powerhouse speakers to your backyard:

  • Terry Barr, CoBank: Global Grain Outlook: Global Demand and More
  • Chuck Conner, President/CEO at National Council of Farmer Cooperatives: Legislative Update from Washington, DC and How Today’s Politics and Policies Affect Your Farm
  • Steve Dlugosz, Agronomist at Harvest Land: Hard-to-Control weeds and Controlling Residuals, and More
  • Charlie Smith, President/CEO at CountryMark: What Global Energy Market Changes Mean for Your Business
  • Todd Dysle, CHS, Inc.: Global Fertilizer Outlook

These nationally known speakers will present multiple times throughout the day, allowing you to set your own schedule. This event is free to the public and you need not be a Harvest Land member to attend. Registration will open in January 2019.

Stay tuned for more details, industry partners who will be available to answer your questions and a full agenda.

What have previous attendees said about the Winter Innovation Forum?

“Excellent program! Kudos to those that planned the event. Speakers were informative, topics were spot on with agriculture in today’s world.”

“Comprehensive, well run, organized and relevant.”

“Very well done, enjoyed the day.”

“Excellent event!”

Mark your calendar today!

Farm to Table: Your Thanksgiving Plate

This time next week you’ll be wishing you owned more elastic waistband pants.

Thanksgiving is quickly approaching, so we thought it was a perfect time to educate eaters about the food on their heaping plate. Because, let’s face it: When you’re stuck at the table with the awkward uncle, you may need something to talk about.

We all know the star of the Thanksgiving Day show is the turkey.  Your turkey might have come from one of these top turkey-producing states: Minnesota, North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana and Missouri. We know a lot of farmers in our trade territory who have put up turkey barns in the last ten years.

Did you know this about the big birds?:

  • Turkey is low in fat, high in protein and is a good source of iron, zinc, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins
  • Cartoon turkeys you normally see are actually dark feathered or wild turkeys. Farmers typically raise a different breed of turkeys which are more efficient at producing meat. These turkeys have white feathers.
  • Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey as the official United States bird.  Dismayed by news of the selection of the bald eagle, Franklin replied, “The turkey is a much more respectable bird, and withal a true original of America.” It makes us wonder how our diets might be different had the turkey triumphed.

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Read more about turkey farming in our area.

  • Cranberries, along with blueberries and Concord grapes, are one of three cultivated fruits that are native to North America.
  • Some cranberry vines in Massachusetts are more than 150 years old.
  • Cranberries don’t actually grow in water, rather they grow on dry land and are harvested using water because cranberries float.

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Did you know Ocean Spray is also a farmer-owned cooperative?

  • Starting in October pumpkins start to make their way onto stoops, into coffee cups and onto plates. Pumpkin Spiced What-te?
  • Squash was part of the Three Sisters, a combination of corn, beans and squash that were planted together by Native Americans
  • The stalks of the corn supported the beans, the beans added nitrogen back to the soil and the squash spread across the ground blocking sunlight from weeds.

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  • Sweet potatoes are a staple on most Thanksgiving Day tables.
  • You may have heard “sweet potatoes” and “yams” used interchangeably, but they are actually from different botanical families.
  • Sweet potatoes come from the morning glory family and yams come from the lily family.

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  • The turkey isn’t the only animal at the table.
  • Most marshmallows contain gelatin, which is a protein substance derived from collagen, a natural protein present in the tendons, ligaments, and tissues of mammals.
  • Before you consider going vegan, remember how marshmallows make the sweet potato casserole.

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We wish your family a very Happy Thanksgiving

 

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Source: American Farm Bureau Federation