The Great Benefits of Fall CN Application

Harvest is around the corner, and now is the time to make the decision on a fall fertilizer application. There are many benefits to applying fall CN, and this week we want to discuss them with you, our farmer-member.

  • Remember: Profitability always comes with good fertility.
  • YieldPro is the best way to manage fertilizer costs in your operation​.
  • Logistically, fall application generally works out better because there is greater flexibility and a less compressed time frame.

Watch this brief video to hear Tyler Kilfoil, YieldPro Specialist and agronomist Steve Dlugosz discuss the great benefits of fall fertilizer application.

 

yieldpro_4c

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

The Merits of Fall Application

Considering a fall application? Let’s talk about that.

  • Fall application is ideal for addressing dandelions, Marestail, and thistles, which are species quite difficult – if not impossible – to control in the spring.
  • Don’t wait until the fall harvest to decide on making a fall application – Time is never in your favor during harvest season!
  • A fall burn-down program means less weed pressure from other winter annuals, and fewer insect problems.
  • Success: Start Clean, Stay Clean, All Season Long.

Join us as manager Adam Culy visits with agronomist Steve Dlugosz and YieldPro Specialist Denver Norris about the strong merits of fall application and view the powerful visual proof.

 

Contact your YieldPro Specialist to ensure your fields start clean and stay clean, in preparation for success in 2020.

 

yieldpro_4c

 

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

Cash Flow Management

Now more than ever, it is pertinent that growers manage their input costs wisely and Harvest Land has ways to help.
There are a variety of vendor offered programs for funding inputs. Some offer immediate cash discounts, or earnings on your investments to expand your purchasing power, others might offer reduced interest rates for funding with payments due at or near harvest time (matching payments with your cash availability)  and some even offer 0% financing through harvest.

This week we wanted to talk about a cash flow management option that actually expands your dollar investment on the date you purchase the product using either your funds or optional borrowed funds. As programs rollout, we will be sure to keep you informed!

 

A second option we’d like to share with you is John Deere Financial’s Special Terms.

John Deere Financial is about more than just financing equipment, parts and repairs. Watch this video for an introduction to Special Terms Financing through John Deere Financial available through Harvest Land.  Special terms financing may be available for the financing of your crop and farm fuel inputs purchased through Harvest Land.

The Special Terms programs provide repayment terms targeted to match cash flow timing and special interest rates on many ag inputs.  Utilize the input finance calculator to assist you in selecting the right choice for your input financing.

We highly encourage you to reach out to your YieldPro Specialist to review these options and ensure you’re maximizing your cash flow options as we roll into 2020.

Additional Resources:

TruChoice site

Input Finance Calculator

Photo Friday: 2019 Answer Plot

DLM_8305

On Tuesday we hosted our 2019 Answer Plot event outside Pershing, IN. We were nervous about low attendance numbers going into the event because of the frustrating season we’ve had. “Would growers attend in good faith that we still have sound agronomic information to share with them?” we wondered.

They did.

We were pleased with the number of farmer-members who attended this annual event and the level of participation. There was tremendous questions, conversation, and insight. Harvest Land is proud to continue to offer this event to our members when so many attend to prove it’s ongoing value. We thank all who joined us for the day.

This week, we want to share photos from the event.

DLM_8231

DLM_8251

DLM_8233

DLM_8275

DLM_8346

DLM_8295

DLM_8278

DLM_8279

 

DLM_8281

DLM_8282
An ear of corn on July 23, 2019!

 

DLM_8320

DLM_8300

DLM_8334

DLM_8336

DLM_8234

DLM_8255

DLM_8268

 

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

 

 

 

 

 

Variability in the Field and Markets

2019 has been an agronomic year unlike any other.

  • Planting date, weather patterns, field-to-field inconsistencies, all of these factors and more have created variability across the land.
  • When considering weed control, you need to focus on the size of the weed, not the size of the crop.
  • The latest USDA grain report will come out on August 12 providing new numbers.
  • Attend the Answer Plot to discuss grain marketing options, propane contracting and agronomy solutions.
Click below to watch YieldPro Specialist Mark Richey visit with agronomist Steve Dlugosz and Grain Department Manager Kyle Baumer about variability in the field and markets.

It’s been a tough year. We hope you’ll join us next week to gain insight on ways to create success in the year ahead.

2019 AP Banner 2

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

No Amber Waves of Grain

If you’re not directly working in agriculture – which, 98% of the population is not – talk of the challenging time in ag may not spur your curiosity. It may only be a 20-second segment on the evening news or a quick mention at the hardware store during check out. You may work or live in town, so it likely doesn’t matter much to you. But, you should care about this challenging time – unprecedented challenging time – because it does affect you. No one is exempt.

What’s the Problem?

The weather has been relentless to those who make a livelihood off the land. Let’s start in the fall of 2018:

When the crop is harvested off the field, a best practice is to apply a fall application, which is a herbicide that kills any weeds that may emerge. This ensures the field is clean and ready to be planted in the spring. But last fall, constant rain delayed harvest and also left fields saturated. This didn’t allow for equipment to get into the fields to apply this product, so the majority of fields went untouched. Fall application became something growers would have to take care of in the spring.

Folks with livestock such as cattle faced challenges from the uncooperative weather, also. Usually, a field can get three cuttings of hay in a summer season but that wasn’t the case in 2018. This resulted in a hay shortage last fall when stockmen were trying to produce or buy hay for the upcoming winter….the winter of 2018-2019: You know, the one that never ended. The extended winter, causing stockman to still feed hay in April, resulted in a real hay shortage. But the winter wasn’t just extended, it was brutal. Record temperatures and snowfall, blizzards striking America’s heartland multiple times, great loss of livestock in inclimate weather…each of these things compressed the issue. Then came the flooding.

flooded-farmer-02-illinois-ap-190603_hpEmbed_3x2_992

Rain began in late March and never stopped. In a time when growers were hoping to apply the herbicide to kill the weeds so they could plant a crop, tractors, planters, and sprayers remained in the shop because they couldn’t get into the soggy fields. And there is a brief window of time in which a farmer can plant corn and soybeans. If that window is missed, there will be no crop at all. Now here we are, the middle of June, and fields still sit empty. Except for the weeds.

IMG_1133
Weeds stand nearly 6 feet tall in a field in Ohio.

 

IMG_4149
A field covered in weeds, prior to planting a seed.

 

Also, in order for growers to get the best crop insurance possible, corn needed to be planed by June 6. After that date, farmers had to make a decision to either let the ground remain completely unplanted, or to plant an alternate crop. Maybe soybeans? The soybean market is already so weak, due to saturation of the market and tariffs, that there would be no money in that. We’re talking record low prices for the commodity.

468510aa30592dbf1b860cd20a3652b8

As of June 9, just 60% of America’s soybean acres had been planted in our highest-producing states, compared with nearly 90% typically planted by this time of year. And just 83% of the corn crop is in the ground in the most productive states, a number that should be pushing 100%.

Some farmers are finally admitting

that this will be the first time in

their lifetime of farming

that there will be no crop. 

This adds to an already extremely difficult run in agriculture. Land O’Lakes recently shared this information:

Due largely to sustained low commodity prices, average farm income in 2017 was $43,000, while the median farm income for 2018 was negative$1,500. In 2018, Chapter 12 bankruptcies in the farm states across the Midwest that are responsible for nearly half of all sales of U.S farm products rose to the highest level in a decade.

Those who support the American farmer are not spared in this grief. Ag retailers, such as the local farmer-owned cooperative, aren’t able to dispense the product they’ve purchased months ago because it has nowhere to go. There is no crop insurance for retail, they simply lose the money. Credit providers won’t get paid because the farmers have no income to make payments. Salesmen who may work on commission go without pay because no one has the money to buy. It is a cycle that affects stress levels and livlihoods by the thousands.

So, how are you affected?

The loss of income in agriculture this year will be in the billions. This will affect small towns across America in very real ways because this unprofitable year will affect ag retailers, seed companies, grain elevators, machinery dealers and more, all of which employs thousands in our area. All of which will have less in their pocketbook in a very real way. And when they’re making much less money, they’re spending less at local stores, restaurants, entertainment, car dealerships and beyond.

The price of food will also see an upward swing as the corn used to produce your favorite tortilla chips or the tomatoes you cook with simply aren’t being produced. We’re usually enjoying sweet corn by now…much won’t even be planted.

It is quite difficult to put into words the depth of despair agriculture is experiencing in this moment. The sickening statistic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that suicide rates in farmers are higher than any other occupation today speaks volumes.

Wake up, America, the Beautiful! There may be no amber waves of grain and no fruited plains.

 

We urge you to take heart regarding this national crisis. It spares no one who eats or cares about their community. We invite you to check on those in your community who work in agriculture. You may only see them at the grocery, church pew, ballpark or parking lot, but a simple word to let them know they aren’t alone in this volatile time could make a world of difference in their state of mind. Let them know their work and effort matters.

We’ll keep this in mind, our faith keeping us rooted:

But I will bless the person who puts his trust in me. He is like a tree growing near a stream and sending out roots to the water. It is not afraid when hot weather comes, because its leaves stay green; it has no worries when there is no rain; it keeps on bearing fruit. – Jeremiah 17:7-8

Harvest Land stands beside our growers as we navigate this unbelievable time. Those of us in production agriculture will get through this because of our unwavering resolve which has benefitted stewards of the land from the beginning of time. And we’ll go on to live admirably, doing the greatest work in the world: Farming.

_DSC0727

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

Maturities Do Matter

We’re getting many questions about making planting adjustments for corn and also soybean varieties in this delayed season. We sat down with agronomist Steve Dlugosz and Seed Manager Brandon Lovett to address concerns and talk about why maturities do matter right now.

Take a look –

 

 

As always, your YieldPro team at Harvest Land is here to discuss with you the best options for success in this difficult season.

 

yieldpro_4c

 

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

Sharpen The Axe: The Pan Test Process

It has been a challenging spring. Just as we think we’re entering the thick of busy season, moisture arrives and prevents us from getting anything done on local land.  

There is still plenty to do at our ag centers, whether we can get into a field, or not.

Mt Summit July 2017

Abraham Lincoln said,

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree

and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” 

The first four hours: That’s where we’ve been over the last two months, as a cooperative awaiting a change in season. So we’ve taken advantage of that time to do things like pan testing our machines so we’re prepared to run on all cylinders when we finally can. Pan testing, you ask?

Our Central Ohio Ag crew recently worked together to pan test machines for spring fieldwork. Pan testing is a process used to calibrate the spread pattern of a fertilizer applicator. Watch the video to see how the machines cross over the pans set at regular positions across the spread pattern, allowing us to evaluate how even the spread pattern is. We can then make adjustments to our machines to ensure our customers are getting the highest quality application every time.

COA

This is one more way we work to provide the best, most accurate service for our farmer-members. We wish you a safe planting season.

 

yieldpro_4c

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

Early Season Fungicide Success and Response to Sulfur

Increased pressure in diseased corn isn’t going away. Sara Nave from our Lena Ag Center, grower Richard Bodey and Agronomist Steve Dlugosz worked together in 2018 to develop and run a box trial that yielded really interesting – and telling – results regarding early season fungicide application and also response to sulfur. Bodey confirms that the treated side had greater plant stamina and standability.

So, how important is sulfur in the production of corn and soybeans? This week we invite you to watch the video below to find out!

 

Actual Trial Results:

Lena Trial 1

Lena Trial 2

 

Lena Trial 3

 

Your YieldPro Specialist is ready to visit with you about your options for the 2019 crop. Contact them today to get a plan in place for success this season!

 

yieldpro_4c

 

hl_logo_vert_4c copy

Setting Priorities in a Compressed Season

IMG_2937

A challenging fall, which wasn’t ideal for applying a fall burn down, has set us up for an interesting spring ahead. Make sure you’re doing your tillage prior to making an application.

Simple Fact: You can’t stay clean if you don’t start clean.

start clean stay clean

Watch as YieldPro Specialist Kyle Brooks visits with Glenn Longabaugh, Winfield United Regional Agronomist, regarding setting agronomic priorities in a compressed season. Glenn makes some excellent points about finding operational success this spring. 

Contact your YieldPro Specialist today to discuss

best practices for success in a season such as this. 

 

yieldpro_4c

hl_logo_vert_4c copy