CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Salute to Service

With more than fifty locations, it can be difficult to hear about all the great things happening within our cooperative, thanks in large part to our team of dedicated employees. In a world with media that seems to sensationalize negative news, Salute to Service is a way to find the good.  

So, let’s hear all the good news. 

We’d like to invite you to participate in our Salute to Service program, which will recognize employees for a job well done.

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You can participate by sending us stories of the positive encounters or experiences you have with Harvest Land employees.

Share with us the instance of an employee going above and beyond, someone handling a difficult assignment with professionalism or an employee representing Harvest Land in an oustanding way.

We invite you to tell us

why an employee deserves to be

commended on a job well done.

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In late fall, we’ll present the top Salute to Service entries to our employee base and ask them to vote for the best example of a Harvest Land employee exceeding expectations. The winner – as chosen by their peers – will be rewarded with a $1,000 cash prize and 2 vacation days. For the person that submits the winning entry? Well, they’ll walk away with $250.

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Keep a watchful eye this harvest season as the weather cools and don’t hesitate to contact us with your story/stories for Salute to Service.

You can submit entries by emailing  nominations@harvestlandcoop.com or contact our President/CEO, Scott Logue at 765.962.1527.

The deadline to submit entries is November 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM.

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2018 Winner, John Bell

 

If you need a pick-me-up today, just read about a few of our previous winners and nominations:

2018 Winner, John Bell

2017 Winner, Kim Buttery

Brian Henderson nomination, A Harvest Land Christmas Story

Randal Reese nomination, Who is Harvest Land?

Tammie Fox nomination, Who is Harvest Land?

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We look forward to hearing about all the great things our hard-working employees do to cultivate positivity in communities and keep our cooperative business strong for the next generation.

 

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Photo Friday: Fueling Freedom 2019

CountryMark’s 2019 Fueling Freedom event was a success at our Elwood, Greenville, Greenfield, Oxford and United Energy locations. We’re proud to partner with CountryMark on this event that does so much for the families of soldiers. More than $57,000 was raised across all participating CountryMark stations. 

We thought this Facebook post from a CountryMark employee encapsulates the value in this event:

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Here is a breakdown of our results:

Greenfield Store: 1990 gallons and $203 in donations

Elwood Station: 355 gallons

KDS Oxford: 1906 gallons and $614 in donations

Greenville Station: 1896 gallons

United Energy: 2738 gallons and $178 in donations

Today’s Photo Friday offers a glimpse of the day!

Many thanks to all who participated. 

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Ohio Grain Entrapment Training

Last Saturday Harvest Land hosted Oxford, West College Corner, Milford Township, Hanover Township, Seven Mile, St Clair and Riley Fire Departments for grain entrapment training in Ohio. The training allowed emergency personnel to practice using grain tube equipment for entrapments in gravity wagons, as well as in a large freestanding pile.

The training occurred at our College Corner Ag Center. Many thanks to the crew from College Corner and Seven Mile for organizing the event and giving up a Saturday for this training, as well as their participation.

As part of the training day, Harvest Land also donated a grain rescue tube to the Oxford Fire Department,  which would be the responding department for our College Corner facility.

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We would like to thank all the participating departments

for their dedication to the safety of our farm families.

 

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Harvest Land Brings Home Ag Volunteer, Corporation of the Year

The Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce had their 2019 Annual Dinner last week and Harvest Land represented the agriculture industry well in front of a crowd of nearly 600. The annual event honors the top businesses, volunteers and community leaders.

Harvest Land’s own Danielle Baumer, Human Resources, won the award for Agribusiness Committee Volunteer of the Year.  The mission of the Agribusiness Committee is to promote agriculture as a major segment of the local economy, lead community efforts regarding agribusiness and economic development, and unite and network groups and activities to address issues important to agriculture.

We asked Danielle about the tremendous honor (she serves on the committee with ag lenders, business owners, insurance representatives, implement dealers, and more) and she had this to say:

I am honored to have received this award, especially within our county where agriculture is not only an essential part of our economy, but also the passion and livelihood of so many. It has been an absolute pleasure to serve on the Agribusiness committee; not only to advocate for Ag within our county (and beyond), but also to have the opportunity to meet so many new faces who also share the same love and passion for ag that many of us do here at Harvest Land Co-op. I am delighted to have the opportunity to assist in representing our Co-op alongside Lindsay, and hope to continue serving for many years to come.

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 Pictured with Baumer is Lee Elzmeyer, outgoing Chamber Board Chairman

Later in the evening, Harvest Land was named Corporation of the Year. This award represents the highest recognition given by the Chamber to a business/corporation. What an honor to be recognized as the business that most exemplifies being a good corporate citizen of the community.  We join a prestigious group of previous winners such as Reid Health, Belden, Hills Pet Nutrition, Richmond Baking and more. Since the award began in 1993, Harvest Land is the first agricultural company to be honored.

It is truly an honor to be recognized by the Chamber as 2019 Corporation of the Year. Much of our work in the last decade has been telling the story of agriculture to those who are not directly involved. Our relationship with the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce has supported those efforts greatly, and we very much appreciate being recognized amongst our peers. Harvest Land is nearly 100 years old, and we will continue to serve the east central Indiana community through our hard-working farmer-members for generations to come.  – Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO

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Lindsay Sankey, Communications Manager, accepts the award for Corporation of the Year on behalf of Harvest Land

While our home base in Wayne County isn’t necessarily rural, a large part of our efforts on NW 5th Street is finding ways to educate the public about agriculture and continue our commitment to cultivating communities. We’re honored to be recognized, not only for our business operations in Wayne County but also through the outstanding people we employ.

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Photo Friday: Propane Safety in Hancock County

We do crop protection.

We do premium diesel fuel.

We do grain marketing.

We do soil sampling.

We do lubricants.

We also do education.

Four different  Hancock County fire departments recently practiced fire fighting techniques that could be used in residential or propane transport leaks or fires. Harvest Land applauds the efforts of these departments for being prepared for any emergency.  Propane for the training was donated by Harvest Land.

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Twelve days ago we were experiencing a summer that didn’t want to go to bed and 80 degree temperatures. Today, fall temperatures have moved in and propane is in demand as folks begin to heat their homes for the cold winter that lies ahead.

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Harvest Land  makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business. All propane employees attend a monthly safety meeting to receive education and refresher training on safety topics.

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Propane is a safe fuel source if precautions are taken and safety devices are in place. Harvest Land makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business.

Here is a quick refresher from our website on propane safety:

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We’re proud to supply propane to training events such as this, if it means that safety awaits on the opposite end.

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Find the Helpers: Lynn, Indiana

As this entry is being written, the country awaits news on the arrival of Hurricane Florence entering the United States and pounding the east coast in unprecedented ways. From states away, we watch the news coverage to see residents evacuating the area and others staying in their homes, preparing for the unimaginable.

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Coverage has included communities coming together to help one another before the worse even arrives. We’ve seen families, teams, and towns boarding windows and doors, delivering supplies, filling sand bags and beyond.

That is the positive side of disaster or hard times: Finding the helpers:

Harvest Land recently acted as helpers, in our own back yard:

On Friday, September 7,  Lynn, Indiana received heavy rains dumping a couple inches on the rural community in less then an hour. This was followed by a lighter, steady rain that lasted several hours.

At 5:07 PM, an alert went out to Lynn residents asking for help filling sandbags. That call was answered by Randolph Ag Center in Lynn who provided a front end loader and an operator to assist in the efforts.

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Finally, at approximately 9:00 PM Friday night, two dump truck loads of sand – 1,000 bags – had been bagged, stacked and positioned for residents’ use.

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Our hope is certainly that we never need disaster preparation or relief, but if we do, we’ll continue to be a part of taking care of the communities in which we live and work however we’re able as your local, farmer-owned cooperative.

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Dave Naylor helped employees of Randolph Ag .   Derek is a volunteer fireman so he was there automatically and Dave Naylor took the Kubota down to help load sand and move skids loaded with the sandbags.  It initially started on Friday Sept 7 with 40 tons of sand bagged  and with over 10 + inches of rain that fell within Randolph county they bagged another 40 tons of sand and over 1000 sandbags available.  Area businesses including Lynn Lions Club, Diamond K Pizza and Hometown Coffee supplied food to the volunteers.

$10,000 Investment in Henry County

US 40, Interstate 70, State Roads 38 and 234 and US 36 are each main roads, east to west, in rural Henry County, Indiana. The county is then divided right down the middle by State Road 3. But once you’re off the beaten, paved paths of these main routes, you’ll find narrow roads where our trucks and equipment travel to and from our Mt. Summit, Millville and Dunreith locations to meet the needs of area farmers and home heat customers.

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Harvest Land and Henry County have a strong, long-standing relationship. We made a move this week to ensure that well-working relationship continues.

Harvest Land partnered with CHS to contribute $10,000 towards the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center. 

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L – R: Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO; Ron Huffman, Chairman, Henry County Local Emergency Planning Committee; Julie Lamberson, Harvest Land Risk Manager; and Brian Becker, Harvest Land Director and Henry County resident.

According to Purdue University research, in the last fifty years more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported, with a fatality rate of 62 percent. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfments − the highest number on record. The overall trend of increased on-farm grain storage only allows for more grain entrapments to happen around the family farm.

Every year accidents occur and responders are dispatched to assist, but most local responders arrive on scene with little to no training in the tactics or tools needed. The
intent of the grain entrapment addition to the Henry County Emergency Training Center is soybeanto add an option that addresses this issue. The completed grain portion of the center will provide responders and the ag community – including FFA members – a place to experience firsthand the dangers associated with entering into corn and soybeans. This training tool allows them to get a feel for both within minutes of each other, re-enforcing the differences in both commodities.

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A top down view of the proposed Grain Safety Training Area

At this time we know of no other facility that provides a place to practice real-world tactics
needed to rescue someone in trouble in both environments side by side. The layout of this
grain entrapment addition will also allow many viewers to see exactly what is taking place without need to share a viewport. It will truly be the first of its kind.

Perhaps most important: The Henry County Emergency Services Training Center is available to all those that wish to schedule its use for career, volunteer and agricultural trainings. Harvest Land is also going to use this facility to train employees and farmer-members, including students.

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We’re excited about this contribution to the Grain Bin Safety and Rescue Training Area at the Henry County Emergency Services Training Center and truly look forward to bringing dozens of employees, customers and students to this incredibly valuable site.

Together, we’re Cultivating Communities.

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Photo Friday: Investment in Eldorado Area

The small (some might say tiny) towns that dot the country side within our trade territory are special to us. Their small-scale grid of streets that travel out past the town limits eventually become the rural routes where our homes sit.

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The diners, post offices and parts stores that keep the commerce going are staffed with folks invested in these Midwestern burgs. The volunteers that give up their nights and weekends to answer the call of duty when an emergency erupts are our family, friends and former classmates. These are a few of the reasons why Harvest Land works to cultivate communities when we see an area of need.

Ohio has been a focus point for us to cultivate as of late.

Harvest Land recently donated a grain rescue tube to the Eldorado, Ohio fire department. The department needed the equipment to perform grain rescue should the emergency arise. Central Ohio manager, Adam Culy, organized the donation and also recognized a need for rescue training with multiple Ohio fire departments.

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Pictured from the right: Carlos Ramos, Adam Culy of Harvest Land, Atley Landes, Travis Simmons, Tom Evans, Stephen Evans, Bentley Evans, Wayne Rogers

So, in mid-March 35 firemen from the Eldorado, New Madison, West Manchester and New Paris fire departments performed a joint grain entrapment training at our Eldorado Ag Center. This Photo Friday includes some shots from that event.

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Seven Harvest Land employees were present for the training: Bob Brunk of Pitsburg, Gary Davis of Harvest Land Transportation, Adam Culy of Central Ohio Ag, Luke Dull of Eldorado, John Ott of Eldorado and Julie Lamberson and Nikki Pyott of Risk Management.

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We are thankful that our rural communities have so many volunteer firemen with courage to serve. Harvest Land is committed to providing resources to help our local departments.

 

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Finding Balance in the 2%

On Tuesday night Harvest Land was a sponsor of the 2018 Wayne County Rural Urban Banquet. This is a treasured tradition in the area, where people who dwell within the city limits share a meal and fellowship with those who make a living out on a country mile. For decades this event has brought farmers, business owners, elected officials and rural route residents to the table. It is a very popular event in east central Indiana.

This year was special in that the keynote speaker was Zippy Duvall, President of HPraerNi_400x400the National Farm Bureau Federation. Zippy is a third-generation farmer from Georgia. In addition to a 400-head beef cow herd for which he grows his own hay, Duvall and his wife, Bonnie, also grow more than 750,000 broilers per year. Have you ever eaten at Chick-fil-A? Chances are you enjoyed one of his birds.
Zippy delivered a fantastic address regarding the current state of government affairs in Washington and the issues on the table that will matter in agriculture, and in turn affect the food on tables in homes and restaurants. Though a large majority of the evening crowd may feel a disconnection to agriculture, the truth is that it affects nearly every aspect of their life, including food, clothing, energy and more.

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Many are familiar with the fact that only 2% of Americans farm today. Decades ago nearly every American family tended a garden because they had to; they depended on it year-around for fresh and canned produce. Today, most who have a garden do so because they enjoy the work and art of growing food for their family to enjoy. Gardens are no longer mandatory for feeding a family (much like 20 hens, a dairy cow, a beef steer, a hog, etc. also were) because the two-percent grow enough for food the rest of us.

The 2% of Americans farm, which gives 98% of Americans the freedom to do other things.

Other things, such as a chef who prepares a meal for new, exhausted parents who haven’t left the house in more than three weeks.

Other things, such as the 911 dispatcher who calmly answers the phone and talks to a terrified stranger on the other end of the line.

Other things, such as the child protective services employee who removes a child from an unimaginable home situation.

librarian with kids in libraryOther things, such as the librarian who encourages a child to put down an iPad and pick up a book, opening up a whole new world.

Other things, such as the generator installer who worked all night so a doctor’s office had restored power by the time the doors opened at 7:30 AM.

Other things, such as the fraud prevention officer at the bank who watches account information so that money within savings accounts stay there.

Other things, such as the fire fighter who runs into a burning building when everyone else is running out.

Other things, such as the loan officer who finds the way to loan a few bucks to a newlywed couple trying to buy their first home.

Other things, such as the tow truck driver who doesn’t sleep when snow falls, roads freeze or potholes get the best of another highway traveler.

2% of Americans farm, which gives 98% of Americans the freedom to do so many other, important things.

While 2% and 98% seem awfully off balance, if you consider the many admirable things others do outside of agriculture, you’ll realize that the work tends to balance. Harvest Land is grateful to be a part of events, such as the Rural Urban Banquet, that allow us to come together for an evening and remember that.

 

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Growth for Advocacy

Last week a group of Harvest Land farmer-members and employees attended the Land O’Lakes Annual meeting in Minneapolis. During this meeting our representative group was part of the launch of Growth for Advocacy.

Growth for Advocacy is a program based around Land O’ Lakes’ vision of an increasing dialogue with consumers in regards to modern agriculture practices and how those of us within agriculture can become better storytellers.

 

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Growth for Advocacy Attendees Included:
Front row: Jessica Naylor, Beth Vansickle, Melanie Caldwell, Kevin Antrim, Brandi Doan, Jeremy Myers, Chris Myers, Amy Circle, Scott Logue (CEO, in attendance for annual meeting only)
Back row: Gene Tapalman (Director, in attendance for annual meeting only), Bob Newhouse (Director, in attendance for annual meeting only), Curt Naylor, Dave Vansickle, Tom Caldwell, Kyle Brooks, Eric Doan, Sean Younclaus, Case Circle

David Vansickle, YieldPro Specialist from our Lapel Ag Center, and his wife, Beth, participated in this program.

“I am very thankful for the opportunity presented to me by the Harvest Land Board and senior leadership to attend the Land O’ Lakes Annual Meeting and Growth for Advocacy,” said Vansickle. “I was able to come away from these three days in Minneapolis with a deeper understanding and appreciation for all of the components of Land O’ Lakes and how they work to help both farmer profitability, but also those at the local co-op.  Growth for Advocacy inspired and taught me to, not only be more proactive in helping to tell the story of modern agriculture across different platforms, but also how to be strategic in my approach.”

 

The purpose of the program is to ensure that our voices, as those directly involved in agriculture, are heard.  That includes anything from social media, to setting up farm visits in our area for schools or communities to visit and learn.  It is also a way to become more involved at a national level by working with Land O’Lakes and doing advocacy in Washington DC by meeting with elected officials.

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With a constant, cyclical list of things to do through out the year in order to plant, grow and harvest a successful crop, it is very easy for farmers to worry about their own operation and believe that someone else takes care of thinking through rules and regulations.

But in reality, the most powerful voices in agriculture at all levels are the farmers, themselves.

Companies like Land O’Lakes can tell the story, but it is far more powerful hearing the stories from the farmers because the decisions made by legislatures will affect their livelihood.

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Additionally, the group was reminded that it is very easy to consider those that are anti-GMO, or supportive of antibiotic-free meat and just tell them they are flat out wrong.  However,  there is so much power in having the ability to listen to their reasoning, and then educate them on the facts. Perhaps not to necessarily to change their mind on the spot, but to encourage them to do more research than just what they may hear or see on Facebook.

Harvest Land President and CEO, Scott Logue, was attending the Annual Meeting and able to visit with Growth for Advocacy participants.

“Harvest Land had the greatest showing of advocates from any other cooperative in the United States,” he reported. “This proves our commitment to being a positive and educational voice for the agriculture industry far past our own farm gates. I’m grateful for the group of Harvest Land farmer-members and employees who made this trip to represent our cooperative. Now, we’ll work to apply the principles learned and become better advocates for an industry that offers so much to our communities and the world.”

 

 

 

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