Fortune Found in Fly-Over States

Though you may not have seen much coverage of it on the local or national news, a natural disaster took place last week in the heart of America. Wildfires ravaged through the plains and prairies of Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas, destroying human life, an estimated 5,000 head of cattle and 1 million acres, as well as homesteads and ranches.

The Wider Image: Deadly U.S. wildfires leave ranches in ruins

This hasn’t been a popular news story because it didn’t affect the masses living within urban areas, it wasn’t politically fueled and there was no rioting to spark controversy. It hasn’t been on the news because it affected a group of people that – rather than march, protest, loot or cause any disturbance at all – tend to  keep their head down, get their work done because they have a responsibility not taken lightly and typically mind their own business.

Since the devastation set in last week, thousands of individuals in hundreds of rural communities nestled in dozens of fly-over states have rallied together to gather supplies  to assist those farmers and ranchers who lost the very basic tools they need to function as a working operation: feed, fences, horses, veterinary care and more.

Livingston Machinery convoy of hay Wednesday morning leaving Fairview, OK and heading to the area impacted by the blazes. 

You see, there is fortune to be found in these fly-over states.

These no-mans-land

middle of nowhere

fly-over states.

The fortune found is rural Americans.
_dsc0067
Where there are rural Americans, you’ll never go hungry

Do you have a new baby? Rural Americans will stop by with casserole and pie.

A death in the family?  Rural Americans will stop by with casserole and pie.

Did your youngest finally get engaged?  Rural Americans will stop by with casserole and pie.

Did your basement flood with the spring rains?  Rural Americans will stop by with casserole and pie.

Is the t-ball season finally over?  Rural Americans will stop by with casserole and pie.

pie

Where there are rural Americans, you’ll never need a high-tech home security system

Rural Americans have made a reputation of keeping a watchful (nosey?) eye on the community. They’re the first to call you when they see a suspicious vehicle parked over by the shop, sure to ask why the vet truck was at the barn for three hours last Monday and the first to call when they don’t see your daughter’s minivan at the house over Christmas.

vet

Where there are rural Americans, you’ll never “not know”

As long as there are sale barns, kitchen tables, high school athletic games, church bulletins and farm auctions, word will get around. Folks in urban America may have high speed internet and Snapchat but they’ll never have the ability to push a message out  to an entire community faster than the rural American main street diner.

The Wider Image: Deadly U.S. wildfires leave ranches in ruins

Where there are rural Americans, you’ll never go without

Rural Americans supply the help when needed, sometimes in the form of a truck load of hay, sometimes in the form of a 14-year-old able-bodied son who is willing to work, sometimes in the form of a quarter cup of sugar. Rural Americans give when they can, where they can, and however they can.  

 

producers

There is fortune to be found in our beloved fly-over states, and it is each other. What an advantage we have to live in a world where we don’t have to hire moving trucks because we have friends with trucks and trailers. We don’t have to send Honey Baked Hams from some warehouse 2,000 miles away because we have a freezer full of farm fresh pork and a recipe card from Mary Jane’s Kitchen, 1976. We don’t have to fight life’s toughest moments alone, because we have Rural American neighbors, friends and strangers across the country bowing their heads when prayer is needed most.

We don’t have to search for good in the world,
because we live amongst it. 

_DSC0147

 

Learn how you can help wildfire victims in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas

Two Hours To Save A Life

Our cooperative business has been around for nearly a century. In that time we’ve seen communities expand, infrastructure develop, technology evolve and most importantly, families grow.

Every generation we work with is different, none better or worse, just different. Each has varying experiences, challenges and opportunities. Something that doesn’t change from generation to generation is the desire for the family farm to be passed on. Each grower we work with is making decisions today that will affect the longevity and success of the family farm, to be handed down to the next, special generation.

Harvest Land is also making decisions today to ensure the next generation is prepared to take the reins when it’s time.

On April 1 we’re hosting a free grain safety youth workshop for ages 10-16. This workshop will have a hands-on live entrapment demonstration portion as well as a classroom session. The event will take two hours and we’re hosting two on the same day; from 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Attendees may choose which session they’d like to attend.

Two hours. That’s the brief amount of time this workshop will take, but the lessons learned from it could one day save a life. Two hours to save a life of someone quite special.

We invite you to share this link and invitation to those in our trade territory, ages 10 – 16, who might find this training valuable.

We are committed to doing our part to ensure
that the family farm is around for the next generation,
and that the next generation is around for the family farm.

2017 Grain Safety Youth Workshop

2017 Scholarships Available

It’s already January. Can you believe it?

img_1515

The school year is half over; kindergartners are almost to first grade and sixth graders are almost to the middle school and seniors are almost finished with locker combinations and mandatory gym class. Time really flies, doesn’t it?

The students in our trade territory aren’t just the local teens or FFA members, they’re part of our Harvest Land family. We’ve seen some of them learn how to drive by picking up feed at our Ag Centers, we’ve visited with them at the counter about their 4-H projects, and we’ve even gotten the real story about how the dent in their dad’s farm truck really came to be. We’ll be honest: We kind of miss the local kids when they grow up and go to school.

258792_10100576067168708_3296890_o

So, we try to help them out a little if we can.

Harvest Land proud to offer twelve $1000 agricultural scholarships for the 2017-18 academic year to seniors graduating high school in 2017.

To be eligible for this scholarship, the student must:

  • be a high school senior entering a post-high school agricultural program
  • be involved in agriculture in their local community
  • and live or attend school in Harvest Land Co-op’s market area.

screen-shot-2017-01-05-at-11-48-59-am

These scholarships will focus on need and leadership potential of future contributors to the agricultural industry. You can access the scholarship application here.

Applications are due MARCH 1, 2017 and can be emailed to scholarships@harvestlandcoop.com  or mailed to the following address:

Harvest Land Co-op

Youth Development Committee

ATTN: Lindsay Sankey

P.O. Box 516

Richmond, IN 47375

Questions can be directed to Lindsay Sankey at 765.962.1527.

We invite you to share this information with a graduating senior who plans on studying agriculture after high school. The future of our agriculture industry is exciting, and we want to help the youth in our communities get there.
_dsc0159-2
Hagerstown FFA Officer Team

Covered In Dust

Harvest Land gave a gift over the last couple weeks, but we never want it used.

We want it sitting, untouched, covered in dust.

We want it stored in a secure but visible place, waiting with dreadful anticipation that it may be needed, but we want not a hand to be laid upon it.

In two, five or ten years, we don’t want to see a finger print on its shiny exterior; not a smudge. We want it to be in the same, pristine, brand new condition it’s in right now. Except maybe, covered in dust.

Our cooperative lost two customers due to grain entrapment in 2016. What an eye-opening year for the rural communities in which we live and work. As a farmer-owned cooperative doing business across state lines and in many different areas, we are committed to the safety of our employees, and also the safety of our members.

In December Harvest Land donated rescue tubes to two fire departments in areas that did not have grain rescue equipment. The first donation was to Bentonville Volunteer Fire Department in Fayette County, Indiana and the second went to Geneva Volunteer Fire Department in Adams County, Indiana. The rescue tubes donated can be used as a tube or wall in any free-flowing material such as sand, grain, gravel or in trench collapses.

IMG_0082.JPG
President/CEO Scott Logue makes the grain tube presentation to the Bentonville Fire Department
IMG_0123.JPG
Allen Bollenbacher (L) presents the grain tube to the Geneva Volunteer Fire Department

As we charge ahead with a new generation gradually taking over the reigns on the family farm, we hope to increase awareness about the dangers of grain entrapment with our customers and also youth in agriculture programs, such as FFA.

A grain entrapment trailer will be on display and conducting live entrapment demonstrations during our Winter Innovation Forum. We ask that you tell others about the Forum and invite them to bring someone who might find this entrapment information valuable. Attendees are invited to participate in the live entrapment demonstration to fully understand how incredibly strong the force of moving grain is.

At the Winter Innovation Forum we’ll also have information on how you can find resources to get a grain safety tube in your area. Help us leave no rural community in our territory uncovered. Join us at the Forum to learn more; Forum registration will open up in January.

_DSC0304.jpg

We understand the members of our cooperative system are not just farmers; they are husbands, wives, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. They are someone quite special. 

The teenager who is thinking more about their Saturday night plans than the bin work at hand.

The parent who is thinking more about their seventh-grader at lunch than the auger below them.

Veteran farmer who is feverishly preparing for his 44th planting season.

Cronk sales call.jpg

If we can get this safety information to one person and help them understand just how quickly grain entrapment happens and how strong the crushing force is, these efforts will have paid off countless times over.

We want to reach everyone.
The young and old. The seasoned and proud. The curious and fresh.
For once, we’re ok with giving you something you’ll leave untouched, covered in dust.