Grain Rescue Tube Donation to Richmond Fire Department

Harvest Land Co-op recently learned of a lack of grain entrapment rescue equipment in the area, and on Monday, July 13 we met that need with a donation of a grain rescue tube to the Richmond Fire Department.

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 Pictured left to right are Lindsay Sankey, Harvest Land Communications Manager, Andrew Buckler, RFD Training Chief, Butch Shiebla, Harvest Land Hagerstown Ag Center Manager, Chris O’Neil, RFD Assistant Chief and Nikki Bulach, Harvest Land Associate Risk Manager.

Total grain engulfment takes a mere twenty seconds. Grain rescue tubes are designed for trench entrapment as well as grain rescue and extraction. The panels of the tube can be reversed to allow first responders to make a wall or a tube from the panels. The sleek finish allows the panels to slide easily into grain, removing the grain from around the victim to relieve pressure as quickly as possible.

There are more than 700 active farms in Wayne county according to the 2017 US Agriculture Census. While there are no farms in downtown Richmond, the Richmond Fire Department has the largest ladder trucks in the county, a trained rope rescue squad and often serves as a mutual aid department to rural fire departments.

In each local community, city and rural fire departments work together to respond with mutual aid. Each department cannot financially afford to be equipped for grain rescue, rope rescue kits, large ladder trucks, and beyond, so within a county, more than one department will respond and assist other departments with equipment and personnel as needed.

To date, Harvest Land has donated seven grain rescue tubes and three rope rescue kits throughout their trade territory, which stretches from Indianapolis east to Dayton, OH and Fort Wayne south to Cincinnati.

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“Harvest Land is committed to safety and ensuring that our first responders are equipped with the tools necessary to save a life if they get called out to a grain entrapment,” remarked Scott Logue, Harvest Land CEO. “Through education and training in many communities, we hope we can encourage local farmers to pause and recognize the many potential hazards of the agriculture profession and plan their work safely. When a grain entrapment call goes out in a community, someone’s parent, child, spouse or grandparent is in immediate and great danger.”

Grain entrapment deaths are preventable. In a 12-month period, two adult men and a child were lost due to grain entrapment in Harvest Land’s trade territory. As a company, we are committed to hosting trainings for fire departments, 4-H groups, and local FFA chapters through our cultivating communities initiative. Our Risk Management team has hosted six grain safety and rescue trainings at our facilities for first responders. In 2019 Harvest Land trained 19 fire departments in the area of grain safety and rescue. Through those trainings, more than 160 first responders were educated and trained properly for grain entrapment in rural communities.

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Andrew Buckler, RFD and Chris O’Neil, RFD Assistant Chief were both present during the donation. “Thank you very much, said Buckler, “We hope we never have use this, but we’re very thankful to have it,”

The donated grain rescue tubes are built in Plain City, Ohio by Gingway Products, Inc., a small welding and fabrication business that saw a need to help the agriculture community.

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Harvest Land Helping Bulldogs

We were recently approached by a community member who works with Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs, which is a group comprised of the 5 local Centerville Churches.  Prior to the pandemic, the churches were starting a cooperative focused on helping fund after school tutoring for families who could not afford it and to pay off lunch debt for students so they could continue to receive school lunches. When schools closed, they refocused their efforts to feeding students in need.

The Centerville school system received approval to provide 10 meals a week through May 20th. They continue to work alongside schools to provide supplemental food during this school break and now provide fresh and pantry foods one time a week to cover the 11 meals per week not covered by the school.

The need for food has grown weekly and in order to provide supplemental food to over 400 students, their recent cost was approximately $1500. This money purchased fresh and pantry food from Gleaners food bank in Indianapolis.  As long as hungry students come to the distributions, they hope to continue to provide them with food through this time of crisis, but they’re running out of funds.

Harvest Land partnered with Land O’Lakes to contribute $1,500 towards Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs so these students could continue to receive meals for another week. As a farmer-owned co-op, we’re awfully passionate about feeding people, especially those in our hometowns.

If you want to learn more about the Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs program or to make a donation to ensure a meal for a child, we invite you to visit their Facebook page.

We’re operating with many unknowns in the world today, but one thing we believe strongly in is that no child should go hungry. We’re proud to partner with Land O’Lakes and Bulldogs Helping Bulldogs during this time to cultivate communities and keep kids fed.

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Salute To Service: Bryant Team

We received 68 nominations from Harvest Land customers and employees nominating their peers in 2019 for our Salute to Service program. This was an amazing response to a simple ask! Salute to Service Banner

This week we wanted to share with you the nomination that took home second place. We’re proud of the work this team – because it took everyone! – did in the community during a time of great need. Read on:

We are nominating Allen Bollenbacher and his entire team at the Bryant location. In the spring of 2019, a tornado touched down on the Blackford/Wells county line north of Montpelier.  The tornado ran straight east up the county line impacting farm after farm for 5 miles.  The tornado struck at night and everyone along the road awoke to a heartbreaking scene of destruction.  Luckily only a few suffered building damage, but trees everywhere were broken and lain flat. Not long after daylight, Allen and several employees from the Bryant Coop showed up at our farm.  The cleanup was overwhelming and took our family days to finish.  What Allen and his team did that first day made it possible to get out of the driveway and move about the farm to care for livestock and repair fence. The most impressive thing though, is what they did when they left us. Allen and his team worked their way east down the county line helping a long string of my neighbors in the same way.  I have heard from several that the help was greatly appreciated. We all need to remember to help one another and to demonstrate that kindness and compassion beyond our familiar circle of family and friends.  No doubt Allen and his crew first showed up to help our family.  For years, we’ve worked together with the folks at HarvestLand Bryant to improve our farm operation, but we weren’t customers that morning.  We were just folks that needed a hand.  Allen and his team proved that as they worked their way east helping out my neighbors all along the way.

Submitted by John & Michael Maddox

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Ag Center Manager Allen Bollenbacher
Thank you, Allen and the entire Bryant team, for doing the right thing on behalf of our cooperative. Your service to the community made a difference in the lives of many!

The Salute to Service program started over again in January. If you encounter a wonderful experience with a Harvest Land employee, we encourage you to shoot us a note at nominations@harvestlandcoop.com or call our CEO, Scott Logue, at 765.962.1527.

 

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Hunger Knows No Season

On this week of Thanksgiving, Harvest Land and Land O’Lakes partnered to donate $2,000 to the Monthly Food Ministry organized by the Centerville United Methodist Church in Wayne County.

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We made a similar donation in 2018 during the warm summer months, but when the church reached out and said more and more families are in line every month and the need was again great, we knew we must help because hunger knows no season. 

Who Will This Donation Serve?

Since their first Monthly Food Ministry in September of 2017, the number of families they support has steadily increased. In 2018, they averaged 65 families a month, but in November of 2019, 91 families came through the door to receive assistance.

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They purchase food for the food ministry from Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana and buying food for approximately 65 families costs around $1,000 per month. The vast majority of that cost has come from the faithful contributions of the members and friends of the Centerville United Methodist Church, but as their assistance numbers go up, so do costs to Gleaners. It only makes mathmatical sense that they must budget more dollars per month to purchase food from Gleaners, so our $2,000 contribution helps to fill that gap.

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Jared Martin, Harvest Land CFO, (front right) presents the check on November 25 at the church. 

The church keeps no record of where the families they serve come from as they want a completely open food ministry, but they do know that families are coming from Cambridge City, Pershing, Richmond, and elsewhere.

So, Where Will $2,000 Go?

100% of the $2,000 will go to purchase food from Gleaners for future Monthly Food Ministries. The food that the food bank pays for from Gleaners includes canned goods, boxed items, and other items that can be stored on the shelf.  Occasionally, Gleaners offers MotherEarthNews_FallVegetableHarvest_Oct_20131meat and dairy products (milk, butter, eggs, yogurt), but they are limited right now by refrigeration and are currently in the process of creating a “cold room” in the church food room.  This project should be finished sometime in December.  They also get produce from Gleaners, but produce is usually provided at no cost. While Gleaners is their main source of produce, it is not their only. They also get produce from local growers, the Amish auction in northern Wayne County, and the Community Garden at the ARC Center in Richmond.

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Have Food, Will Travel

When necessary, the Monthly Food Ministry will deliver, and every month there is at least one family that needs transportation. They revealed to us that last summer a lady and her two daughters walked a great distance from a trailer park to receive food. Rather than make her carry two or three heavy boxes/bags back on a busy highway, they loaded her up in a pick-up truck and transported her, her daughters, and her food back home.

Too often the food ministry group hears, “I don’t know what I would do without this food.”  Almost all of the folks receiving food are overly grateful for the assistance.

We’re proud to partner with Land O’Lakes to provide this hunger relief assistance in the Centerville area this holiday season.

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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Salute to Service

With more than fifty locations, it can be difficult to hear about all the great things happening within our cooperative, thanks in large part to our team of dedicated employees. In a world with media that seems to sensationalize negative news, Salute to Service is a way to find the good.  

So, let’s hear all the good news. 

We’d like to invite you to participate in our Salute to Service program, which will recognize employees for a job well done.

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You can participate by sending us stories of the positive encounters or experiences you have with Harvest Land employees.

Share with us the instance of an employee going above and beyond, someone handling a difficult assignment with professionalism or an employee representing Harvest Land in an oustanding way.

We invite you to tell us

why an employee deserves to be

commended on a job well done.

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In late fall, we’ll present the top Salute to Service entries to our employee base and ask them to vote for the best example of a Harvest Land employee exceeding expectations. The winner – as chosen by their peers – will be rewarded with a $1,000 cash prize and 2 vacation days. For the person that submits the winning entry? Well, they’ll walk away with $250.

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Keep a watchful eye this harvest season as the weather cools and don’t hesitate to contact us with your story/stories for Salute to Service.

You can submit entries by emailing  nominations@harvestlandcoop.com or contact our President/CEO, Scott Logue at 765.962.1527.

The deadline to submit entries is November 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM.

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2018 Winner, John Bell

 

If you need a pick-me-up today, just read about a few of our previous winners and nominations:

2018 Winner, John Bell

2017 Winner, Kim Buttery

Brian Henderson nomination, A Harvest Land Christmas Story

Randal Reese nomination, Who is Harvest Land?

Tammie Fox nomination, Who is Harvest Land?

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We look forward to hearing about all the great things our hard-working employees do to cultivate positivity in communities and keep our cooperative business strong for the next generation.

 

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Photo Friday: Fueling Freedom 2019

CountryMark’s 2019 Fueling Freedom event was a success at our Elwood, Greenville, Greenfield, Oxford and United Energy locations. We’re proud to partner with CountryMark on this event that does so much for the families of soldiers. More than $57,000 was raised across all participating CountryMark stations. 

We thought this Facebook post from a CountryMark employee encapsulates the value in this event:

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Here is a breakdown of our results:

Greenfield Store: 1990 gallons and $203 in donations

Elwood Station: 355 gallons

KDS Oxford: 1906 gallons and $614 in donations

Greenville Station: 1896 gallons

United Energy: 2738 gallons and $178 in donations

Today’s Photo Friday offers a glimpse of the day!

Many thanks to all who participated. 

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Ohio Grain Entrapment Training

Last Saturday Harvest Land hosted Oxford, West College Corner, Milford Township, Hanover Township, Seven Mile, St Clair and Riley Fire Departments for grain entrapment training in Ohio. The training allowed emergency personnel to practice using grain tube equipment for entrapments in gravity wagons, as well as in a large freestanding pile.

The training occurred at our College Corner Ag Center. Many thanks to the crew from College Corner and Seven Mile for organizing the event and giving up a Saturday for this training, as well as their participation.

As part of the training day, Harvest Land also donated a grain rescue tube to the Oxford Fire Department,  which would be the responding department for our College Corner facility.

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We would like to thank all the participating departments

for their dedication to the safety of our farm families.

 

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Harvest Land Brings Home Ag Volunteer, Corporation of the Year

The Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce had their 2019 Annual Dinner last week and Harvest Land represented the agriculture industry well in front of a crowd of nearly 600. The annual event honors the top businesses, volunteers and community leaders.

Harvest Land’s own Danielle Baumer, Human Resources, won the award for Agribusiness Committee Volunteer of the Year.  The mission of the Agribusiness Committee is to promote agriculture as a major segment of the local economy, lead community efforts regarding agribusiness and economic development, and unite and network groups and activities to address issues important to agriculture.

We asked Danielle about the tremendous honor (she serves on the committee with ag lenders, business owners, insurance representatives, implement dealers, and more) and she had this to say:

I am honored to have received this award, especially within our county where agriculture is not only an essential part of our economy, but also the passion and livelihood of so many. It has been an absolute pleasure to serve on the Agribusiness committee; not only to advocate for Ag within our county (and beyond), but also to have the opportunity to meet so many new faces who also share the same love and passion for ag that many of us do here at Harvest Land Co-op. I am delighted to have the opportunity to assist in representing our Co-op alongside Lindsay, and hope to continue serving for many years to come.

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 Pictured with Baumer is Lee Elzmeyer, outgoing Chamber Board Chairman

Later in the evening, Harvest Land was named Corporation of the Year. This award represents the highest recognition given by the Chamber to a business/corporation. What an honor to be recognized as the business that most exemplifies being a good corporate citizen of the community.  We join a prestigious group of previous winners such as Reid Health, Belden, Hills Pet Nutrition, Richmond Baking and more. Since the award began in 1993, Harvest Land is the first agricultural company to be honored.

It is truly an honor to be recognized by the Chamber as 2019 Corporation of the Year. Much of our work in the last decade has been telling the story of agriculture to those who are not directly involved. Our relationship with the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce has supported those efforts greatly, and we very much appreciate being recognized amongst our peers. Harvest Land is nearly 100 years old, and we will continue to serve the east central Indiana community through our hard-working farmer-members for generations to come.  – Scott Logue, Harvest Land President/CEO

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Lindsay Sankey, Communications Manager, accepts the award for Corporation of the Year on behalf of Harvest Land

While our home base in Wayne County isn’t necessarily rural, a large part of our efforts on NW 5th Street is finding ways to educate the public about agriculture and continue our commitment to cultivating communities. We’re honored to be recognized, not only for our business operations in Wayne County but also through the outstanding people we employ.

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Photo Friday: Propane Safety in Hancock County

We do crop protection.

We do premium diesel fuel.

We do grain marketing.

We do soil sampling.

We do lubricants.

We also do education.

Four different  Hancock County fire departments recently practiced fire fighting techniques that could be used in residential or propane transport leaks or fires. Harvest Land applauds the efforts of these departments for being prepared for any emergency.  Propane for the training was donated by Harvest Land.

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Twelve days ago we were experiencing a summer that didn’t want to go to bed and 80 degree temperatures. Today, fall temperatures have moved in and propane is in demand as folks begin to heat their homes for the cold winter that lies ahead.

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Harvest Land  makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business. All propane employees attend a monthly safety meeting to receive education and refresher training on safety topics.

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Propane is a safe fuel source if precautions are taken and safety devices are in place. Harvest Land makes safety a top priority to give you peace of mind for your family or business.

Here is a quick refresher from our website on propane safety:

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We’re proud to supply propane to training events such as this, if it means that safety awaits on the opposite end.

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Find the Helpers: Lynn, Indiana

As this entry is being written, the country awaits news on the arrival of Hurricane Florence entering the United States and pounding the east coast in unprecedented ways. From states away, we watch the news coverage to see residents evacuating the area and others staying in their homes, preparing for the unimaginable.

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Coverage has included communities coming together to help one another before the worse even arrives. We’ve seen families, teams, and towns boarding windows and doors, delivering supplies, filling sand bags and beyond.

That is the positive side of disaster or hard times: Finding the helpers:

Harvest Land recently acted as helpers, in our own back yard:

On Friday, September 7,  Lynn, Indiana received heavy rains dumping a couple inches on the rural community in less then an hour. This was followed by a lighter, steady rain that lasted several hours.

At 5:07 PM, an alert went out to Lynn residents asking for help filling sandbags. That call was answered by Randolph Ag Center in Lynn who provided a front end loader and an operator to assist in the efforts.

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Finally, at approximately 9:00 PM Friday night, two dump truck loads of sand – 1,000 bags – had been bagged, stacked and positioned for residents’ use.

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Our hope is certainly that we never need disaster preparation or relief, but if we do, we’ll continue to be a part of taking care of the communities in which we live and work however we’re able as your local, farmer-owned cooperative.

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