A Photographic Lesson in Perspective

It was a day full of media creation:

  • Interview an agronomist on-camera about current disease pressures.
  • Interview an energy manager on-camera about propane safety.
  • Film a propane sales specialist conducting an in-home safety check.
  • Take various photos during each of these video shoots to have stored in our photo library for use down the road.

We arrived at the homestead where we were going to shoot the in-home propane safety check and I was impressed. A beautiful home which sat off the road, a well-manicured yard, and flawless landscaping that seemed to put a bow on the entire package.

I took many photos that day and have since used them extensively over the last two years.

Fast forward to Tuesday of this week. I asked our CEO to give a promotional piece a final review before sending it to print.

“The detailer looks good. Accurate. But that photo needs replaced. It is terrible,” said our CEO.

“What photo?!” I responded. I work to ensure every print piece that comes out of our office is professionally done and pleasing to the eye.

“The propane one. What do you see when you look at that photo?” he asked.

I studied it.

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“A man delivering propane on a sunny day. A clean truck,” I was quick to remark.

“Weeds! Two weeds. Big weeds. They really stand out,” he responded.
I laughed. “Those aren’t weeds! Those are flowers. That’s part of the landscaping around  the tank. Black eyed Susan’s. They’re just not in bloom,” I defended my use (extensive use over the last two years) of the photo. It had been on every social media channel and used in several print pieces.

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Black eyed Susan

He studied the photo. “Those are weeds. Goldenrod. They need pulled or sprayed.” He was steadfast in his conviction of weed identification and treatment.

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Goldenrod

I asked why, if the photo bothered him and it was used so many times, had he not mentioned it before now? He revealed that he had confidence that I would notice the weeds, remove the picture from things and the problem would be solved. Boy was he wrong!

I was taken back by the misunderstanding, so I tried explaining that the very reason we shot at that particular customer’s home was because it was so well tended.

Well groomed.

Landscaped with colorful details waiting to emerge.

No weeds.

Immaculate.

Our CEO then explained that anyone who sees this photo won’t know that. They only see a guy delivering propane with two big weeds in the way. Our audience didn’t drive up the driveway and see the house, the yard, the barn. They only see the goldenrod (black eyed Susans).

He was right. Unless you know your flowers pre-bloom, these plants looked like weeds.

I appreciated that particular photo because of the natural lighting that day. The clean and well-maintained propane truck. The faceless driver, intentional so no one associated the image with a particular person. The spotless propane tank. And finally, the two flowers awaiting their time to shine.

But unless you were in my shoes – or, the shoes of the homeowner who planted them with intention – you wouldn’t know those were flowers. You may think those were weeds.

It was a classic lesson in perspective: What one person sees, another may not.

That is why it is critically important to value perspectives as we move through life experiences, careers and relationships.

In fact, the key to successful relationships lies solely in our ability to value the perspective of another and find the ability to look at things from a point of view other than our own.

It can be tough, but it can be done.

Is there an area in your personal life, career or relationships that might benefit from a change in perspective?

To step out of your shoes and into another’s?

To ask questions in order to learn, rather than assume? Especially during this time of uncertainty and unpredictability.

Perhaps now is the time. I know that a brief conversation in the corner office earlier this week sure changed the way I’ve thought in the last couple days, and it will continue to do so. I’ll certainly remember this lesson when I am tasked with the job of taking photos or video on behalf of our cooperative.

Now, I’d love to visit more with you about perspective, but I’m spending the rest of the morning replacing the goldenrod (black eyed Susans) photo on every piece of promotional material on which it has appeared.

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By Lindsay, Communications Manager

 

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Our Commitment to Propane Safety

Harvest Land delivers propane in eastern Indiana and western Ohio to keep homes, businesses, schools, and churches running. Propane has proven its versatility for heating homes, heating water, cooking, fueling gas fireplaces, lighting and heating outdoor living spaces, crop drying, greenhouse operations, irrigation and much more. It’s environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

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We operate with no hidden fees (such as delivery, environmental and membership). It’s as simple as that. We also have programs to fit your budget and lifestyle with contracts, tank programs, guaranteed pricing and more.

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Safety for our customers is our top priority. This is why each of our propane professionals are CETP trained and certified. This week we invite you to take a look inside our propane business and the careful steps we take to ensure your family is safe with Harvest Land Propane.

Tracks in the Snow

“A perfect weekend to stay inside and warm,” the meteorologist said on the morning newscast earlier this week. I couldn’t agree more. Rain, followed by several inches of snow, followed by a cold front predicted to grip the midwest and east.

As I was making chili, wearing the new wool socks I got for Christmas and making another cup of hot chocolate for the little one in the living room, I noticed how perfect the snow across our yard already was. We hadn’t had memorable snow in some time. It seemed it was finally winter. Winter is sure pretty from the picture window.

Hours later I was folding clothes upstairs when I noticed the perfectly imperfect snow in front of our house. There were tracks I’d not noticed before.

You see, while I was enjoying our warm home, hot chocolate, wool socks and a picture-perfect scene from my warm home, someone came and filled our fuel oil tank without me even knowing.

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How differently those strapped with the responsibility of heating homes, businesses, schools, and churches must view winter from the rest of us.

I was thinking of how pretty the snow looked, he was probably thinking how it makes pulling a hose just a bit tougher.

I was thinking of my feet getting too warm in my new wool socks and he was probably img_2001thinking that he should have left the house at 5:30 this morning with another pair.

I was thinking of chili and hot chocolate on my menu, he was probably wondering if he could scarf down his cold meat sandwich on the way to the next house.

I was thinking that it was a great weekend to stay home, and he was out making sure every home on his route was safe and warm.

I was thinking of a weekend with no plans, he was thinking that he’ll be on-call all weekend for those who need a fill.

This weekend – and always – we salute the many Harvest Land fuel truck and propane drivers who put in extra hours when school is canceled, businesses close early or roads are unpassable.

It is when we are safe and warm at home

that this team suits up and goes to battle.

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Many thanks to the fuel and propane drivers, service technicians, support staff and part-time crew for stepping in on these bitterly cold days to serve our communities and families. We appreciate your tremendous effort in keeping us warm.

 

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Winter Warmth: Now Is the Time

We hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if you changed your calendar seven days ago, you should already know: Winter is coming.

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While we’re still hitting the 90-degree mark in Indiana and Ohio, it won’t be long until the autumn chill sets in and harvest is running full speed ahead. Before we get to that point, we want to remind you that now is the perfect time to plan ahead, be prepared and consider a budget payment plan for heating your home, shop and business this winter.

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We take pride in providing propane and fuel oil to heat homes and businesses throughout eastern Indiana and western Ohio. Safety for our customers is our top priority. This is why each of our propane professionals are CETP trained and certified.

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Programs

Automatic Fill – This program takes the worry of running out of product off of your mind. Harvest Land will keep track of the product level in your tank for you.

Budget – This program allows you to make monthly payments on the product you use.
Guaranteed Price, Prepay and Budget Programs available to suit your needs. Contact us to learn more!

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They say when you’re dying of thirst it is far too late to think about digging a well – the same can be said for heating your home!

Contact Harvest Land today to get your family taken care of before Old Man Winter shows up at your doorstep.

 

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