What Dad Taught Me

Father’s Day is Sunday and you know what that means.

Kids and wives across the country are standing in front of the card section at the local grocery store, staring blankly into an endless selection of over-the-top-sappy, thats-just-not-my-Dad greeting cards, searching for the perfect card that sends the perfect message.

Something as basic as: You’ve been a good Dad. Thank you.

But those cards don’t seem to exist. And even if they did, there would be a strange feeling of inadequate expression if that were the only thing they told dad on Father’s Day.

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In the spirit of appreciating the wonderful fathers we’ve been fortunate to know, this week we wanted to share with you a few the things dear old dad has taught us over the years.

We asked a handful of people to complete one simple sentence:

My Dad taught me ____________________________.

The response to this request was great.

And funny.

And might have made our eyes water a bit, but we’d never let Dad see that.

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My Dad taught me that he can take the chain off your bike if you do not get home on time for supper.

My Dad taught me that if someone is mad at you, you’ve done something. Look at yourself and your actions that could have caused their change towards you.

My Dad taught me to trust in God for everything.
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My Dad taught me if you ever feel lonely, eat in front of a mirror.

My Dad taught me that family is forever.

My Dad taught me there is no “I” in “TEAM”

My Dad taught me the key to a good birthday is low expectations.

My Dad taught me about 4-H and the FFA.

My Dad taught me to work hard, yet stay humble.

My Dad taught me that is isn’t a good idea to eat spinach with strangers.

My Dad taught me that the main thing is: don’t panic. He usually said this when I was about to have a full-blown panic attack.

My Dad taught me how to spot a sick calf, drive a tractor, throw a football, hit a baseball, and cast a line.

My Dad taught me how to be competitive, yet be a good loser at the same time.

 

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My Dad taught me the value of family.

My Dad taught me what true dedication is, his love for us kids, and mom has always been his motivation to work extremely hard, and to never give up! There are times that he shoulda given up, but he knew that wouldn’t leave a lasting impression on us boys.

My Dad taught me how to serve.

My Dad taught me to love teaching.

My Dad taught me to be an individual, not to roll with the crowd for the popular opinion.

My Dad taught me to suck it up.

My Dad taught me that getting up early makes for a more productive day.

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My Dad taught me to work harder – no one owes you anything.

My Dad taught me that you don’t have to agree with someone to be respectful towards them. A lesson that is really coming in handy this election year.

My Dad taught me how to overcome.

My Dad taught me the value in doing things the right way, even when it isn’t easy. As a rural veterinarian, he could have taken shortcuts many times when he knew people couldn’t pay for his services. Instead, he chose to take the high road and did the right thing for every animal that walked into that clinic. He accepted payment for those services in unconventional ways – we got vegetables from a garden, fishing gear, a gun or two, and lots of random tools and small equipment. Because of his hard work and dedication to serving the community, he’s well respected in our hometown and all the ones that surround it. People who grew up here and have moved away bring their pets home when they come to visit so that Dad can give them a check up!

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My Dad taught me to be a Purdue Boilermaker for life.

My Dad taught me to think before speaking.

My Dad taught me to be trustworthy and responsible.

My Dad taught me work ethic in such a way that as an adult I’ve never questioned getting a job done. Every able body should work.

My Dad taught me respect, determination, motivation and an everlasting love for Jesus.

My Grandpa (who basically was my dad) taught me that your word is who you are and what you’re all about. He also taught me that you have to work hard at everything you do in life. I carry both of these in my thoughts every single day and they have helped me get to where I am today.

 

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My Dad taught me how to work at a young age. We’re talking Child Protective Services involvement, young age.

My Dad taught me to always keep your word. Whatever you promised someone in whatever time fashion and for whatever dollar figure, you fulfill that. Even if it means you may lose money on this job, you may stay up all night long performing the task you thought would just take a few hours, you keep your word. The next time, learn from your mistake by giving yourself more time and/or quoting the job better, but always be a person of your word.

My Dad tried to teach me to use a stick shift…we had a lot of laughs but not much success…to this day I still struggle with taking off.

My Dad taught me to work hard in life in order to achieve your dreams. I always observed how hard he worked professionally to support my mother and 8 children and then at home how hard he worked to maintain our home and still find time to play with us, swim with us and take us on mini one-day vacation trips. Being the youngest child, I was at home with my parents after my father retired and we spent many nights just talking about life.  Oh how I miss that!

My Dad taught me how to be frugal. To this day I still take the hotel soap.

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My Dad taught me to never use a chainsaw by myself . . . ever.

My Dad taught me how to ride a bike, drive a car, how to bowl and to put peanuts in your coke bottle before drinking. An interesting man, my dad was!  I miss him.

My Dad taught me faith, love and laughter will bring you through anything.

My Dad taught me to have a sense of humor.

My Dad taught me to be stoic.

My Dad taught me that nothing in this world is free. You will have to work for everything that you get. It is not acceptable to rely on anyone else to support and provide for you or your family.

My Dad taught me to never grab a hot exhaust on a tractor.

My Dad taught me that my priorities should be in the following order: God, family and country. If I keep these in the right order I will live a prosperous and happy life. Also, no matter how far you have fallen God knows where you are and will listen to you if you only reach to him.

My Dad taught me that I was fortunate to be born into a good, trustworthy and hardworking family. It is my responsibility to hold up to that heritage and to raise my children to reflect the same values.

My Dad taught me to treat people the way that you would want to be treated.

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My Dad taught me basic, simple mathematics (or, tried to anyway).

My Dad taught me how to use a manual transmission at the risk of destroying it.

My Dad taught me that mom was always right.

My Dad taught me to drink beer and listen to baseball on the a.m. radio in the evening.

My Dad taught me I should always over-tip at a restaurant. If I can’t afford to tip well, I should eat at home.

My Dad taught me that you’ll never taste a better tomato than one right out of your own garden.

My Dad taught me not to do something just for the recognition.

My Dad taught me the value of making my passion my paycheck.

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My Dad taught me to never pee on an electric fence.

My Dad taught me that if all else fails, ask Siri.

My Dad taught me that men who respect their mothers respect their wives, being my mother.  This is a good trait to look for when searching for a husband.

My Dad taught me that cutting my brother’s hair was a bad idea.

My Dad taught me the importance of faith and instilling it in your children.

My Dad taught me to always be 15 minutes early to everything. Ten minutes early is five minutes late.

My Dad taught me to love the Lord and his church.

My Dad taught me there are two things I can always control: my effort and my attitude.

My Dad taught me be open to things that I don’t understand, don’t agree with or have never experienced. “Step outside your comfort zone and learn from what happens.”

My Dad taught me the importance of education, asking questions and learning.

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My Dad taught me how to drive a tractor.

My Dad taught me to never sweat the small stuff.

My Dad taught me how to fry a “juicy” egg. And yes, I get weird looks when I order my eggs this way in a restaurant today.

My Dad taught me to always do my best, no matter what I was doing.

My Dad taught me that a pretty smile is nice, but a strong backbone is the most admirable feature on a person.

My Dad taught me to swing a bat, dribble a basketball and serve a tennis ball, but with that also came an even more meaningful lesson in sportsmanship.

My Dad taught me by his actions and not his words. Always be friendly and cheery to others, volunteer at church, drink beer, throw parties and don’t take life too seriously.

My Dad taught me to have a sense of humor, to laugh at myself and always have a smile on my face.

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My Dad taught me to care about others.

My Dad taught me to “Say what you will do and do as you say”!

My Dad taught me to ride a bike, drive a car, throw a strike, shoot a gun and cut the grass.

My Dad taught me to be proud that I grew up on a farm and learned the value of hard work. While I didn’t always agree as a kid, I certainly think now as an adult there is no better way to grow up.

My Dad taught me to keep my credit and my last name clean.

My Dad taught me that if you’re going to be dumb, you better be tough.

My Dad taught me to be independent, but not to refuse someone’s help if I need it.

My Dad taught me the most important thing:

How to be a great Dad.

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We really hope you like your card.

 

 

 

 

Service In Action: Pack Away Hunger

Sometimes it’s good to remember that part of our fabric isn’t limited to corn, soybeans, diesel and propane.

The cooperative roots of service run deep and span miles throughout the communities in which we do business. Appropriately, of course, since our business is built on the cooperative spirit of helping one another reach a common goal.

Harvest Land believes in a culture which reflects the importance of service to others, and we created our Cultivating Communities program to allow that culture to thrive. Cultivating Communities encourages Harvest Land employees to volunteer eight service hours annually to organizations that align with her personal values.

Pack Away Hunger is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and others who suffer from hunger and malnutrition. It’s a group that our farmer-members and employees have become familiar with over the last three years, as we’ve partnered with local churches and FFA chapters to pack meals that went on to local food banks and also Mission Guatemala.

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In March twenty-three churches, nine FFA chapters, various community organizations and Harvest Land Co-op employees and farmer-members partnered for the 5th annual Pack Away Hunger event, which packaged 162,216 nutritious meals to be distributed. The meals went specifically to Gleaner’s, Midwest Food Bank and eleven more local community food pantries which will receive between 1,000 to 10,000 meals, depending on their size and the area they cover.

The meals, which more than seven hundred volunteers prepared over multiple shifts, were formulated to provide a rich source of easily digestible protein, carbohydrates and vitamins needed by a malnourished body. They consist of high-quality white rice, fortified soy, a blend of six dehydrated vegetables and twenty-one vitamins and minerals. They’re packaged in fourteen-ounce bags.

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Part of Harvest Land’s purpose is to do what’s right while utilizing technology, science and hard work to feed a growing world. We really cannot think of a better organization of which to partner to align with our cooperative’s purpose. We had several employees spend their Saturday at Pack Away Hunger, working towards a common goal to take care of one another. It’s what rural communities do, and we’re proud to be a part of it.

 

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But what happens after the Pack Away Hunger Event? After the bags are sealed and the trucks are loaded and the hair nets – beard nets for some Harvest Land employees – are tossed in the trash never to be seen again? How do those eight hours committed by our farmer-members and employees go on to serve others?

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Here is one example. You can see the local Western Wayne FFA chapter working at First Church in Hagerstown to distribute food during the monthly mobile food pantry. Part of this offering was food that we packaged at Pack Away Hunger.

And just last week we received these photos directly from Guatemala:

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The following were taken at ‘Tat Loy’ a drug and alcohol rehab center in San Lucas – Toliman. This particular location is a recipient of the rice meals that we packed for their residents. There are more than 72 individuals at the facility currently.

Right now the building is a two story building with a small deck on the roof but they are expanding the second story and building a full covered deck on the roof, which will become the third floor, to serve more occupants. In these photos they are building a frame around the a rebar column in advance of pouring a concrete column that will eventually support the upper floor.

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Pretty neat to see the familiar Harvest Land logo at work so far from home, huh?

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We thought it pretty special that the meals we packed one morning earlier this spring are not only feeding neighbors who may typically go without, but also the people of Guatemala  whom we’ll likely never have the opportunity to meet.

We’re doing what’s right while utilizing technology, science and hard work to feed a growing world. Sometimes, that includes hairnets, cups of rice and assembly lines rather than 16-row planters and seed tenders.

And we’re ok with that.

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The Cooperative Spirit: A Brief History

We’re so glad you stopped by to visit.

Do you have a quick minute for a story?

Or maybe, a history?

Years ago – we’re talking long before weather maps were kept on cell phones in pockets – folks relied on working together to defend their land, hunt, produce and gather food and create shelters and clothing. It was their cooperative spirit, one that encouraged working together to achieve a common goal, that allowed the people to create more, support larger groups and elevate success as culture evolved. It was through information sharing that early societies were able to triumph through the most arduous times.

At Harvest Land Co-op, we’ve never forgotten that cooperative spirit. In fact, it’s the very fabric of our business.

Our cooperative is unique from many businesses in that nearly 5,000 farmers who have made their homes in Indiana and Ohio own us. Together they collaborate for our success by utilizing Harvest Land’s services, sourced products and expert employees. Continued investment in our farmer-owned cooperative ensures the longevity of such a system that welcomes and serves so many.

This blog was created as a resource for our members and also those with whom we share communities. We want to use this space to answer questions about what our cooperative does, explain why we’re so passionate about land and resource conservation and share our steadfast belief in creating a responsible food system (speaking of food systems: don’t forget to pick up milk after work).

Join us on this expedition and come back weekly as we dig deeper to the roots of Harvest Land Co-op and the many fibers that make our cooperative spirit sturdy, nearly 100 years after our inception.

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