Photo Friday: 2019 Winter Innovation Forum

The rain, snow, and sleet didn’t stop growers from attending our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum. We had more than 400 in attendance from Indiana and Ohio and welcomed them each to a day of information, insight and conversation.

On this Photo Friday, we invite you to take a look at a few photos from the day.

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Many thanks to all who joined us!

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2019 Forum Speaker Line-Up

FAKE NEWS.

We’re over it.

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That is why our Winter Innovation Forum brings in the nation’s best presenters to Wayne County, giving you only the facts on the industries that matter most for your business.

We thought today may be a great time to introduce you to the five individuals who will lead the discussions throughout the day on February 20.

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Terry Barr
Senior Director, Knowledge Exchange Division,
CoBank, ACB

Terry Barr, a nationally recognized economist, is senior director for CoBank’s Knowledge Exchange Division, an information-and-knowledge-sharing initiative created in 2009. The division draws upon the expertise and insights of experts inside CoBank as well as those of its customers and other third-party experts and professionals in the industries it serves.

Previously, Dr. Barr served as chief economist for the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives in Washington, DC from 1985 to 2009. Prior to joining NCFC, Terry held several positions during a 14-year tenure at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He served as chairman of the World Agricultural Outlook Board, which is responsible for coordinating USDA’s commodity forecasts and for publishing its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates. He also served in the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture as director of economic analysis. Terry holds a doctorate in economics from Washington State University.


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Chuck Conner
President and CEO, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives

Charles F. (Chuck) Conner became president & CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives (NCFC) on January 22, 2009. As president of NCFC, Conner will oversee the organization’s work to promote and protect the business and public policy interests of America’s farmer-owned cooperatives. He will also provide the strategic vision for the trade association as it continues to seek new ways in which to add value for its membership.

Prior to joining NCFC, Conner had served as the Deputy Secretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture since mid-2005. In this capacity, he was the Chief Operating Officer (COO) overseeing day-to-day operations of the department. Conner interacted directly with President George W. Bush and his senior staff to formulate domestic and international food, trade, security and energy policy. He led development of the Bush Administration’s $300 billion Farm Bill proposal and the strategy to educate and inform industry, constituents and Congress.

From August 2007 to January 2008, Conner served as both USDA Secretary and Deputy Secretary. He played a key role in developing the Administration’s immigration policy including important changes to the H2A program.

Conner’s experience also includes the assignment of Special Assistant to the President, Executive Office of the President, from October 2001 to May 2005, working on the 2001/2 Farm Bill to develop the strategy behind the transfer of several USDA agency functions to the newly formed Department of Homeland Security. From May 1997 to October 2001 Conner served as President of the Corn Refiners Association. He also served for 17 years as an advisor to U.S. Senator Richard Lugar of Indiana.

Conner is a graduate of Purdue University, with a Bachelor’s of Science degree and is the recipient of Purdue’s Distinguished Alumni Award. He and his wife Dru have four children.


Steve Dlugosz, CCA, Agronomist, Harvest Land Co-opDlugosz

Steve Dlugosz received a BS in Agronomy from Purdue University in 1980, and a MS in Entomology from Purdue University in 1991. He started his career as an Area IPM Extension specialist for Purdue, and worked an eleven county area of southwest Indiana. In 1985, he went to work for Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Inc. He has held various agronomic positions within the Cooperative system over the years of industry consolidation, and is currently the Lead Agronomist for Harvest Land Co-op.

Steve has been heavily involved in the CCA program since its inception, and has served in a number of leadership roles including Chairman of the International CCA Board in 2006. Steve has also served on a number of agricultural and industry boards and committees over the years. In 1997 he was appointed by the Governor of Indiana to serve on the Indiana Pesticide Review Board and currently serves today. He testified before two different Congressional Committees on Agriculture in 2005 and again in 2010


dysleTodd Dysle, UAN Products Manager, CHS

Todd Dysle has had a 31-year career in the Crop Nutrient industry, working for a retail/wholesale fertilizer distributor. He has spent more than 10 years with two international trading companies. Dysle joined CHS in 2008 as the Product Manager for UAN (Nitrogen Solutions) and has since handled all crop nutrients at one time or another. Today he manages the UAN and the Ammonia books

It with great fondness that Dysle shares his fertilizer business experience with you today. He has witnessed many industry changes over the years and very much enjoys sharing that information with farmers.

Todd Dysle was raised on an Ohio dairy farm where his passion for agriculture was ignited. He went on to serve as a State FFA Officer and then received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University. Dysle went on to be a Farm Broadcaster for 10 years and also a part time grain farmer.

Dysle has lived with his wife Paula in the Tampa, FL area the past 18 years. In his spare time he enjoys travel, golf, and his two granddaughters who reside in Ohio.


smith-charlie-091504Charlie Smith,
President/CEO
CountryMark

Charlie Smith is President and CEO of CountryMark Cooperative Holding Corp. (CountryMark). CountryMark’s operations encompass oil exploration and production, refining, and distribution-refined products to its branded retailers. Charlie began his career with the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) where he held a number of petroleum-related assignments in Houston, Anchorage and Dallas. In 1991, he joined a leading international petroleum consulting firm where he became Vice President and Director, managing the firm’s Mergers & Acquisitions practice. Charlie joined CountryMark in his current capacity in January 2003. Charlie holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Purdue University and is a graduate of the Hoosier Fellows program at Indiana University’s Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence. He also is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas. Charlie served eight years on the Advisory Board of the new Indiana State Department of Agriculture for which he received the Partner in Progress Award from Lt. Governor Becky Skillman. He currently serves on the Board of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, the Board of Advisors for Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business (Indianapolis), the Board of the Michigan Oil and Gas Association, and the Industry Advisory Council for Purdue University’s School of Chemical Engineering. Charlie recently received the 2015 Purdue University School of Chemical Engineering’s Outstanding Chemical Engineer Award.


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If you attend one meeting this winter, make it this one.
All the experts, in one place, on one day.
NO FAKE NEWS.

REGISTER NOW

Winter Innovation Forum: February 20, 2019

We invite you to save the date for our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum, to be held at the Wayne County Fairgrounds on Wednesday, February 20, 2019.

This full-day event brings another round of powerhouse speakers to your backyard:

  • Terry Barr, CoBank: Global Grain Outlook: Global Demand and More
  • Chuck Conner, President/CEO at National Council of Farmer Cooperatives: Legislative Update from Washington, DC and How Today’s Politics and Policies Affect Your Farm
  • Steve Dlugosz, Agronomist at Harvest Land: Hard-to-Control weeds and Controlling Residuals, and More
  • Charlie Smith, President/CEO at CountryMark: What Global Energy Market Changes Mean for Your Business
  • Todd Dysle, CHS, Inc.: Global Fertilizer Outlook

These nationally known speakers will present multiple times throughout the day, allowing you to set your own schedule. This event is free to the public and you need not be a Harvest Land member to attend. Registration will open in January 2019.

Stay tuned for more details, industry partners who will be available to answer your questions and a full agenda.

What have previous attendees said about the Winter Innovation Forum?

“Excellent program! Kudos to those that planned the event. Speakers were informative, topics were spot on with agriculture in today’s world.”

“Comprehensive, well run, organized and relevant.”

“Very well done, enjoyed the day.”

“Excellent event!”

Mark your calendar today!

Confused Winter = Opportunity

Have you seen the weather forecast for the week ahead?

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A year ago we wondered if a snow storm might prohibit farmers from making their way to the Winter Innovation Forum (it didn’t, but the way; 700 growers showed up) and this year we wonder if potential attendees may be planting corn.

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Mother Nature is sure playing an interesting card and keeping temperatures above freezing for the next 15 days. The problem with abnormally warm temperatures in February is that people begin to get a little too aggressive on their spring planning and a (very likely still to happen) cold snap could really mess up the best laid plans.

For instance:

crocuses-wallpaper-1343-1474-hd-wallpapersGrandma’s crocuses are coming up and she’s already looking for a reason to begin searching for perennials to plant. Crocuses are beautiful, but seeing them in February means their pretty buds may not make it through the month of March when the cold, true winter weather returns. Additionally, she’s already filled the north end of the dining room table with her garden starts, anxious to get seed in the ground. Now her dining room table only seats 3 instead of six; that’s why you’ll have to eat in shifts.

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Mom already washed and stored all of the coveralls in a wishful-thinking kind of way. She is hoping that Mother Nature is, in fact, a Mother and no mom in her right mind would want to bring out the worn out Carhartts once they’ve been double washed and stored.

 

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While the warm winter weather may seem like a good time to celebrate spring, the truth is that this is an ideal time to get fertilizer spread on your fields. Take advantage of the sunshine and dry days and prepare now for spring’s work load. Spreading fertilizer in February reduces future work load in the extremely busy spring days. Contact your YieldPro Specialist now to take advantage of this window in February to get some of April’s work done.

That way you have more time for other things, such as helping Grandma plant those tomatoes or lugging that 50 lb. tote of clean Carhartts up to the shop loft for your mother.

 

LAST CHANCE!! Register for the 2017 Winter Innovation Forum here

 

Seats Filling for Winter Innovation Forum

We were going through our Winter Innovation Forum registrations and noticed a few names not on the list.

Yours was actually one of them.

This single-day event saves you the time and hassle of attending 5 farmer meetings throughout the cold months. Instead, register now to attend our Winter Innovation Forum and get the information you need to thrive – not just survive – in this agriculture climate.

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This event will be well worth your time,
and that is a statement we’ll stand behind.

Covered In Dust

Harvest Land gave a gift over the last couple weeks, but we never want it used.

We want it sitting, untouched, covered in dust.

We want it stored in a secure but visible place, waiting with dreadful anticipation that it may be needed, but we want not a hand to be laid upon it.

In two, five or ten years, we don’t want to see a finger print on its shiny exterior; not a smudge. We want it to be in the same, pristine, brand new condition it’s in right now. Except maybe, covered in dust.

Our cooperative lost two customers due to grain entrapment in 2016. What an eye-opening year for the rural communities in which we live and work. As a farmer-owned cooperative doing business across state lines and in many different areas, we are committed to the safety of our employees, and also the safety of our members.

In December Harvest Land donated rescue tubes to two fire departments in areas that did not have grain rescue equipment. The first donation was to Bentonville Volunteer Fire Department in Fayette County, Indiana and the second went to Geneva Volunteer Fire Department in Adams County, Indiana. The rescue tubes donated can be used as a tube or wall in any free-flowing material such as sand, grain, gravel or in trench collapses.

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President/CEO Scott Logue makes the grain tube presentation to the Bentonville Fire Department
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Allen Bollenbacher (L) presents the grain tube to the Geneva Volunteer Fire Department

As we charge ahead with a new generation gradually taking over the reigns on the family farm, we hope to increase awareness about the dangers of grain entrapment with our customers and also youth in agriculture programs, such as FFA.

A grain entrapment trailer will be on display and conducting live entrapment demonstrations during our Winter Innovation Forum. We ask that you tell others about the Forum and invite them to bring someone who might find this entrapment information valuable. Attendees are invited to participate in the live entrapment demonstration to fully understand how incredibly strong the force of moving grain is.

At the Winter Innovation Forum we’ll also have information on how you can find resources to get a grain safety tube in your area. Help us leave no rural community in our territory uncovered. Join us at the Forum to learn more; Forum registration will open up in January.

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We understand the members of our cooperative system are not just farmers; they are husbands, wives, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. They are someone quite special. 

The teenager who is thinking more about their Saturday night plans than the bin work at hand.

The parent who is thinking more about their seventh-grader at lunch than the auger below them.

Veteran farmer who is feverishly preparing for his 44th planting season.

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If we can get this safety information to one person and help them understand just how quickly grain entrapment happens and how strong the crushing force is, these efforts will have paid off countless times over.

We want to reach everyone.
The young and old. The seasoned and proud. The curious and fresh.
For once, we’re ok with giving you something you’ll leave untouched, covered in dust.